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Dutch And Flemish Furniture | by Esther Singleton



No special inducement need be held out to an educated Englishman at the present day to take an interest in a particular field of the arts and crafts of the Low Countries. Long before the nobles of Flanders, France and England were associated in attempts to free the holy places from the pollution of infidel possession, the dwellers on the opposite coasts of England, Normandy and the Netherlands had been bound together by many dynastic and trade bonds. As we follow the course of history, we find that the interests of the English and the Flemings were inextricably connected; and there was a constant stream of the manufactures of the Low Countries pouring into English ports...

TitleDutch And Flemish Furniture
AuthorEsther Singleton
PublisherThe McClure Company
Year1907
Copyright1907, The McClure Company
AmazonDutch and Flemish Furniture

By Esther Singleton Author of "French and English Furniture," etc

With Numerous Illustrations

-Preface
No special inducement need be held out to an educated Englishman at the present day to take an interest in a particular field of the arts and crafts of the Low Countries. Long before the nobles of Fla...
-The Middle Ages
Ecclesiastical Art - Wood-carving and Carvers - Primitive character of the Furniture of Castles and Mansions - Huchiers - Menuisiers - A Typical Bedroom - Dinanderie - Wood-work and panelling - Chest,...
-The Middle Ages. Part 2
A fine example of a Mediaeval carved oak stall is shown in Plate I. By the richness of the carving it must originally have held an important position in some choir. Richly ornamented with Gothic shaft...
-The Middle Ages. Part 3
Before the great artists of the Netherlands arise, we must go to the miniatures of early manuscripts in order to form a correct idea of a Mediaeval interior. We usually find a very simple arrangement ...
-The Middle Ages. Part 4
In the old manuscripts of the Middle Ages, we find many illustrations of the developments of the chest and its various uses. Fig. 4 shows a long chest with short solid legs on which bedding is laid, a...
-The Middle Ages. Part 5
We have already seen one form of chair in Figs. 4 and 5, which show a box with a lid for the seat, on which is a cushion. This chair has arms and a high panelled back. The common stool, faldstool, or ...
-The Middle Ages. Part 6
This was the period when the Roman was in full flower, and the tapestries naturally turned from Biblical to heroic stories. The artists and weavers now begin to devote their energies to the production...
-The Middle Ages. Part 7
From Cordova the manufacture spread into Portugal, Italy, France and Brabant. The great centres for gilded leathers in the Middle Ages were Cordova, Lille, Brussels, Liege, Antwerp, Mechlin and Venice...
-The Burgundian Period
The luxurious Dukes of Burgundy - Possessions of the House of Burgundy - The Burgundian Court - Household of Philip the Good - the Feast of the Pheasant - the Duke of Burgundy at the Coronation of Lou...
-The Burgundian Period. Part 2
Another instance of the magnificent display of this Duke occurred when he accompanied Louis XI to Rheims for the ceremony of his coronation in 1461. This is described as follows by the Duke of Burgund...
-The Burgundian Period. Part 3
When Charles the Bold (1433-1477) succeeded his father, Philip the Good, in 1467, he maintained his Court with the same state, ceremony and luxury. His daily life was surrounded by pomp and punctiliou...
-The Burgundian Period. Part 4
Turning now from the buffet d'apparat, he describes the buffet d'usage. Regarding the service, The new Duchess was served by the cup-bearer, the carver and the pantler, all English, all knights and...
-The Burgundian Period. Part 5
Alienor also informs us: When one of the princes had served Monsieur and Madame (the Duke and Duchess of Burgundy) with sweetmeats, one of the most important personages, for example, the first chambe...
-The Burgundian Period. Part 6
The Brabant artists perhaps manifested their fertility most in wood-carving. Flanders, during the fifteenth century, produced an enormous number of retables, choir-stalls, pulpits, chairs, tables, com...
-The Burgundian Period. Part 7
The influence of Memling and the Van Eycks and their school was insistent, although comparatively few of their pictures were translated into tapestry. One of the pupils of the Van Eycks, Roger van der...
-The Burgundian Period. Part 8
In 1430, one Jean Hosemant, a tapestry-weaver of Tournay, was in Avignon and the Pope's chamberlain, the Archbishop of Narbonne,ordered him to make a tapestried chamber on the hangings of which were ...
-The Renaissance
Dawn of the Renaissance - The Transitional Period - Coffers and Bahuts - Court of Margaret of Austria - Perreal's Style - Margaret's Tomb by Perreal - Taste of the Regent - Margaret's Tapestries, Carp...
-The Renaissance. Part 2
Another huche, or bahut, of the sixteenth century, of more delicate workmanship, is shown in Plate VII. The subject of the central panel is taken from the story of David. Allegorical figures decorate ...
-The Renaissance. Part 3
If you think it necessary for me to go and I can be of service to you, I am ready to do all that it pleases you to order, but otherwise, it is not the part of a widow woman to trotter and visit armie...
-The Renaissance. Part 4
Regarding the Brussels tapestries, the same old traveller tells us: Especially admirable and yielding great profit, is the trade of the tapestry-makers, who weave, design and warp pieces in high war...
-The Renaissance. Part 5
Mechlin was the capital of the Netherlands while Margaret was Regent. Her palace, now the Palais de Justice, shows both the old and new styles. The older parts date from 1507, and were built in the la...
-The Renaissance. Part 6
Some of the terminal figures on the ends of the stalls are very fine, particularly Matthew, Luke, David, Solomon and Daniel in the lions' den. The heads and busts that are developed out of the foliage...
-The Renaissance. Part 7
In truth, it is the taste for caryatides and grotesque figures surrounded by garlands, and supporting broken pediments that predominate in all his compositions. The result is a certain character of h...
-The Renaissance. Part 8
The principal fault with which the Flemish artists of the period are reproached is that of painting the lily. They frequently are lacking in restraint, and overcharge their surfaces with riot of ill...
-The Renaissance. Part 9
The pilaster is a decorative necessity of the upright, marking the division of the facades, or accenting the uprights of the chests, chairs, dressoirs, etc. The cartouche (Italian cartoccio) scrolled...
-Second Period of The Renaissance
Second Period of the Renaissance - Court of Mary of Hungary - Charles V a Fleming - Influence of Burgundian Court in Spain - Gilded Leather - Wealth of the Nobles in the Netherlands - Margaret of Valo...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 2
Antwerp now becomes the centre of commerce, and the town expressed so much wealth and was so crowded with ships that when the Ambassador from Venice, Marino Cavalli, landed on the Scheldt, in 1551, he...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 3
In his own country, he was called the king of architects. He may be called the Dutch Du Cerceau. He was contemporary with Du Cerceau; and was apparently greatly influenced by the work of the latter, o...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 4
A glance at Plate II will inform us that the bed of the fifteenth century depends more for its effect upon the curtains and other draperies than on the framework. In the time of the Renaissance, we fi...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 5
Folding-tables were also in use; in Margaret of Austria's inventory, mention is made of a little table in the Spanish fashion which opens and closes. Chairs are still heavy and carved more or less ...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 6
Flemish chests were in great demand in France. In an inventory, we learn that Marguerite des Bordes, Bordeaux, had, 1589, a bahut de Flandres, barred with iron bands, two locks and keys; George Beau...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 7
Guicciardini continues: The others it would be prolix to enumerate, and informs us that most of these artists visit Italy. Some return loaded with wealth and honour to their native country, while ...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 8
No home of wealth was complete without musical instruments, and owing to the exquisite paintings with which the case and top, both inside and out, were ornamented, the clavecin, harpsichord, or spinet...
-Second Period of The Renaissance. Part 9
In 1638, the private secretary of Charles I, Sir F. Windebank, had a long correspondence with a painter named Balthazar Gerbier, then in Brussels, regarding the purchase of a virginal in Antwerp for t...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish)
Renewed Italian Influence - Rubens: his Studio, his House, his Pupils, his Influence, his Successors - Seventeenth Century Wood-carvers - Developments and Tendencies of Furniture - Crispin Van Den Pas...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 2
On the right is a colossal buffet or sideboard, the pillars being caryatides, and behind these is a half-hexagon cupboard. Busts and vases adorn the top. Below is a fine salver, evidently in the style...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 3
This work was restored in 1845 by two Bruges artists, Van Wedeveldt and P. Buyck. The Flemish wood-carver had still plenty of work to do in the churches; but in domestic furniture the lathe was makin...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 4
Of his life little is known, except that he was the son of the great engraver of the same name and was born in Utrecht in 1585. His Boutique Menuiserie contains a series of plates of furniture. It is ...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 5
The doors and interior woodwork of these houses in many cases are precious records of the skill of the Dutch and Flemish wood-carvers of the period. One of the most famous houses in Mechlin in the se...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 6
From the Inganck van't voorhuys, we step into a more luxurious hall called het cleyn salet naast het voorhuys, hung with ten large pieces of leather with gold patterns on a silver background. The furn...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 7
The library of the Pitsembourg was well stored with religious works. The chapel, a beautiful edifice built in 1228 and dedicated to St. Elizabeth of Hungary, contained some fine carvings, two crucifix...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 8
Mortlake had closed when William III ordered his victories to be commemorated in woven pictures. The cartoons for The Battle of Bresgate, The Descent on Tor bay and The Battle of the Boyne, were drawn...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 9
During the Spanish dominion in the sixteenth century, the chair in which great personages sit for their portraits has a high straight back with the side posts usually ending in carved lions' heads, st...
-Seventeenth Century (Flemish). Part 10
The masters of this school of ornamentation were numerous. Hitherto Flanders has overshadowed the Northern Provinces of the Netherlands in art products; but beginning with De Vries, Holland assumes eq...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch)
Famous Dutch Architects - The Royal Palace on the Dam, Het Loo, the Mauritshuis and Huis ten Bosch - Interior Carvings - Specimens of Rooms and Ceilings in the Rijks Museum - Love of the Dutch for the...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 2
Het reysen is een taech nyet yder opgelcgt, En 't is nyet al te veel en sonder blaim gezegt, Het huys is als een graf, waerin wy altyt wonen, In 't aerdsche tranendal. Plate XXXV. - Chairs. RIJKS ...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 3
Another dates from the first half of the eighteenth century. Architecturally it is very interesting; but the interior furnishings are much simpler than the above. A third house, belonging to the fami...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 4
The comptoir is also found in the homes of the rich, and the lady of the house often sits there with her children, not because it is the most attractive place, but in order to keep the better rooms ...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 5
English travellers of this period unanimously praised the way the Dutch houses were kept. One wrote: They are not large, but neat, beautiful outside and well furnished inside; and the furniture is so...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 6
Fifty years later, Guicciardini, after praising the general state of the civilization and courtesy of the people, and remarking on the beauty of the public and private buildings, says: But after all ...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 7
Omitting the cellar and store-rooms, we pass upstairs to the bedroom of the master and mistress on the second floor. Pictures, chiefly family portraits, adorn the walls. The floor is of wood, highly p...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 8
This was the case in most of the burghers' houses. These show-rooms were used only on some special occasion; otherwise they were never entered except for cleaning. This took place weekly and oftener, ...
-Seventeenth Century (Dutch). Part 9
We also note in this room a beautifully made wicker cot, or basket, for the baby. In early days this article of furniture was of large dimensions, and the nurse sat beside it with a large screen at t...
-The Importance Of Porcelain
Rise of Dutch Taste in Decorative Art - Influence of Foreign Trade in the Dutch Home - Accounts of Porcelain by Mediaeval Travellers: Edrisi, Ibn Batuta and Shah Rukh; Quotation from Pigapheta - A gre...
-The Importance Of Porcelain. Part 2
Besides the above, this lady possessed forty-two vases, pots, tazzi and plaques of porcelain of the earliest days when Europeans went to China, which are of a beautiful white, and decorated with all ...
-The Importance Of Porcelain. Part 3
His (the King's) plate is neither gold nor silver, for that is forbidden by their law, but of porcelain or of other China fabric. It is impossible to tell all the great riches and all the rare and ...
-The Importance Of Porcelain. Part 4
It is natural that from the fact that the Portuguese had the monopoly of the East Indian trade, the finest examples of Oriental workmanship should be found in Portugal and Spain, Lisbon being the entr...
-The Importance Of Porcelain. Part 5
The blew, wherewith they paint the porcellane, is anill, whereof they have abundance, some do paint them with vermilion, and (for the king) with yellow. The same traveller also notes: The workmansh...
-The Importance Of Porcelain. Part 6
Here also is made another species that I had never yet seen: it is all pierced and cut-work: in the centre is a cup to contain liquor. The cup is in the same piece and forms a part of the cut-work. I...
-The Importance Of Porcelain. Part 7
Turning now, for a moment, to tea, we find that it made its way into public favour somewhat slowly - far more so than porcelain. It was known to the Dutch before 1600, but was not in general use till ...
-The Importance Of Porcelain. Part 8
In 't midden van de zaal daar stond een gueridon, Op 't zelve een heteltje, zo blank gelijk een zon. 't Trekpotje was bekleed met zuiver zilverlaken, Opdat geen vogt het goud van 't lofwerk zou misma...
-The Dutch Home
Love of Porcelain - The Amsterdam Mart - Prices of China in 1615 - Oriental Wares before 1520 - Luxury of the Dutch Colonists - Rich Burghers in New Amsterdam - Inventories of Margarita van Varick and...
-The Dutch Home. Part 2
A China guilte cabonett upon a frame, 1 1os.; a large square China worke table and frame of black vernishe and gold, 6; one faire crimson velvet chaire richlie imbosted with copper and spread eagle...
-The Dutch Home. Part 3
Among these were six satin cushions with gold flowers, a suit of serge bed-curtains and valance with silk fringe, six scarlet serge bed-curtains with valance and silk fringe, a green serge chimney clo...
-The Dutch Home. Part 4
Wherever the Dutch went, they lived not only in comfort, but in all the elegance and even splendour that their means would allow. In the New or the Old World, the merchant princes surrounded themselve...
-The Dutch Home. Part 5
Plate XXVII, one of Jan Steen's famous interiors, from the Rijks Museum, has several interesting features: the architectural door and the high chimney-piece with stove being the most curious. The bed ...
-The Dutch Home. Part 6
One has only to glance at the contemporary inventories to realize the wealth and luxury of the period. It is only in a few instances, such as the old Castle of Devel-stein, when occupied by Cornelius ...
-The Dutch Home. Part 7
Among the other vanities carefully preserved in the drawers and on the shelves were the fans, masks, lace and jewels; chatelaines, ribbons, hats, bonnets and caps; silk, cloth and serge stockings rich...
-The Dutch Home. Part 8
The table-cover or carpet was a most important decorative feature of the Dutch room. It was generally a handsome Oriental rug. This was thrown over the dining-table, the ordinary table in the hall o...
-The Dutch Home. Part 9
Tables and chairs were found in every room. About 1640, the drop-leaf or hang-ear tables came into use. They were usually made of solid walnut- or sacredaan wood. The chairs had high curved, or l...
-Dutch Furniture Under French And Oriental Influence
The Dutch Craftsmen in the Employ of Louis XIV - Huguenot Emigration - Marot - The Sopha - Upholstery - The Bed - Chairs - Sconces - Tables - Rooms - English and Dutch Alliances - Hampton Court - Quee...
-Dutch Furniture Under French And Oriental Influence. Part 2
The elaborate designs upon the rich Genoa velvet that adorns this piece of furniture are quite in the Marot style. Plate XLVIL - Carved Oak Bahut. CLUNY MUSEUM, PARIS. Fig. 38: Ornament in the Au...
-Dutch Furniture Under French And Oriental Influence. Part 3
Of The Porcelain Room .. Geheel zijn huis, ja zelfs het klein gemah, Blonk als een diamant - duizend fijne kopjes Vercierden 't kabinet, hoe veel japanse popjes. Uit amber, zeekoraal en roosverw paerl...
-Dutch Furniture Under French And Oriental Influence. Part 4
The furniture was due to Marot and Wren. The comparatively small amount of furniture now to be seen in the show-rooms of Hampton Court belongs mainly to this period. It consists principally of chairs...
-Dutch Furniture Under French And Oriental Influence. Part 5
His diary and expense account shows that his purchases of furniture and bric-d-brac faithfully reflected the prevailing taste for Oriental wares and the style refugie. He did not exclusively patronize...
-Dutch Furniture Under French And Oriental Influence. Part 6
But the merchants, sending over English patterns and models to India, and bringing such quantities of Indian lacquered wares (especially within the last two years), great numbers of families are by t...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries
Lacquer - Oriental Methods - European Importations and Limitations - Prices - An Ambassador's Report - Singerie, Chinoiserie and Rocaille - The Dutch Decadence - Interiors of Cornelis Troost - Mirrors...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 2
The most valuable furniture of lackered ware, viz., cabinets, chairs, tables, baskets, and other things of that sort, as also the richest porcelain ware, come from Japan. For when the Emperor sends a...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 3
Trade with Holland: the balance paid us is thrice as much as we receive from either Portugal or Spain. But when we consider the great number of smuggling ships that are employed between this country ...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 4
Brussels was an important centre of industry and art throughout the century. Its citizens included many men of wealth who took interest in art, science and literature. In his Journey in the Year 1793...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 5
The course of Dutch and Flemish furniture during the rest of the eighteenth century tamely follows the channels of French design. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Empire style was in v...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 6
The old farmhouse of which the modern traveller sees so many examples, with its red-tiled or thatched roof visible beneath its sentinel poplars, usually consists of a large living-room, a kitchen, a c...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 7
The outsides of the houses, with their cheerful white cornices on windows and doors, ornamental roofs and large windows with Flemish shades and adorned with blooming plants and boxes of flowers, give ...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 8
Along the top of this rare old piece of furniture was suspended a row of porcelain plates. About the room were curiously carved and designed chairs and tables, some of the latter finely inlaid; and o...
-Furniture Of The Eighteenth And Nineteenth Centuries. Part 9
Holland has not escaped the present taste for the collection of antiquities; but in that country where there is so deep a love of home, and where the peasants guard their possessions with the same ten...







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previous page: English Furniture | by Frederick S. Robinson
  
page up: Furniture Books
  
next page: A History Of Furniture | by Albert Jacquemart