Cotelette Milanaise

"In an Italian restaurant we recently came across a table specialty which may be recommended as an appetizing entree. We refer to cotelette Milanaise with curry sauce. The ordinary cotelette Milanaise, consisting only of a veal-chop or cutlets encrusted with bread-crumbs and egg, with the traditional quarter of a lemon to stimulate the palate, is a common dish enough, but the addition of curry sauce gives it a distinct excellence".

Italian Dishes

Le Restaurant Ilalien makes a specialty of Italian dishes, and on its carte figure prominently the names of Lasagne, Ravioli, Tagliarini, Spaghetti and Risotto, besides the fam-ous limbales of Milan, and the filling, if not particularly tasty, polenta, a kind of porridge made of maize-flour.

Polenta

Is also made of chestnut-flour. "The food made of the chestnut which is most in favor is thepolentd. This is made by simply boiling the chestnut-flour 10 or 15 minutes with a little salt to flavor it, taking care to keep it constantly stirred. This is eaten with cream, and is said to be very healthy and nutritious".

Necci

"The food called Necci is composed of chestnut-flour formed into a cake, and is made by first mixing the flour with cold water, and then making cakes piled one upon another and separated by chestnut-leaves moistened with water. The whole mass is then cooked over a hot fire, and the cakes are taken off one by one when the leaves are almost burned, and are then eaten with cream and butter.

Zabbaglione

Is the name of an Italian sweet entremet to be had in perfectiou at the Hotel d'Italie. It is composed of whipped yolk of egg sweetened, and mixed with 'Capri' or some other white wine, and is served in a frothy mixture in cups".

Polpetti

Croquettes of meat of any kind mixed with grated cheese stirred over the fire with a thick sauce and seasonings, rolled and shaped when cold; breaded and fried.

Italian Meringue

Boiled icing, made of 1 lb. sugar boiled to the crack and 6 whites whipped very firm stirred in; used to ice cakes and to dry bake as "kisses," also to mix in frozen punch for punches a la Romaine.

Italian Pastes

Those well known everywhere are macaroni and vermicelli; others are iagliarini, spaghetti, fidelini, lasagnes, and various small kinds and shapes; they are all essentially of the same substance, but of different qualities, some being made of the best wheat-flour, some with a proportion of corn-flour.

Italian Soups

Generally those soups which contain or are served with some form of these pastes, and with grated cheese handed around separately.

Italian Raviolis

Little turnovers made of balls of chicken forcemeat size of a grape, inclosed in nouilles paste; poached in water, placed in a dish with grated parmesan and sauce; served on same method as a garbnre, with soup in another tureen, to be taken up and eaten with the soup.

Sardinian Raviolis

Instead of chicken forcemeat they are filled with a paste made of spinach, eggs, breadcrumbs, cheese, and butter.

Lasagnes A La Milanaise

Lasagnes boiled, mixed in a sauce or ragout of gravy, cheese, mushrooms, truffles, tomato sauce, etc.