Pigeons (Fr)

Pigeons. The same in both languages.

Pigeonneaux (Fr)

Young pigeons; squabs.

Pigeons, Wild

There are times in some parts of the country when immense flocks of wild pigeons settle down in the forest for a few days, and the people from the neighboring villages shoot them by thousands, glutting the market for a brief period. With a little experience it is easy to pick out the young birds, which may be roasted or broiled, and the heavier old ones should have long cooking in a gravy.

Pigs' Feet

They are put up in packages of all sizes in spiced vinegar, making a convenient and very acceptable article of hotel provision all through the season of cool weather. Generally served cold, very often breaded and fried, or broiled, or stewed in white sauce thickened with yolks. Pieds de Porc A la Ste.

Meneiiould

Pigs' feet breaded and fried.

Boneless Pigs' Feet

Can be bought in cans. They are capable of being cooked in ornamental or shapely ways by being heated and pressed first.

Pilau, Pillau, Or Pilaf

Turkish dish of rice and butter, with or without meat or tomatoes or other additions, generally, however, having mutton cut in dice, and.a flavoring of fried onions.

Pilchard

English sea fish like a herring.

Pilot Fish

So called from its being the forerunner of the shark. The appearance of pilot fish around a vessel is always followed by the appearance of the white-bellied monsters. Pilot fish are captured for market and cooked by frying, broiling and baking.

Pimento

Allspice.

Pivon Nut

Mexican nut like the pistachio, about the size of a beech nut. Sold in most city fruit stores.

Pineapple

The pineapple is grown abundantly in the Bahamas and all the West India islands and is cheap in all American markets.

Canned Pineapple

Is a favorite supper fruit; it is compote of pineapples ready prepared.

Grated Pineapple

In this form it is used in pineapple ice cream and pineapple sherbet. See Ices, Sherbets.

Pineapple Pie

An open pie or tart with grated pineapple and sugar for filling.

Pineapple Cream Pie

Grated pineapple mixed with powdered crackers and custard mixture, baked in a crust, not covered. This fruit, can be used in all the principal ways same as other fruits, in tarts, marmalade, jelly and preserves. (See Apples, Apricots).

Pintade (Fr)

Guinea Fowl.

Pique (Fr)

Larded with strips of bacon or tongue, truffle, mushroom stalks, etc.

Filet De Bceuf Pique

Larded fillet of beef.

Piquant Sauce

Brown sauce made piquant by adding chopped shallots, little vinegar and pepper, boiled a few minutes, chopped capers and gherkins added, and meat glaze if only ordinary brown sauce be used.

Plaice

An English flat-fish, larger than a flounder, distinguished by yellow spots on the back.

" Plaice, to be eaten in perfection, should directly it is caught be cleansed, its head cut off, and then be hungup by the tail, and sprinkled with salt, and left to dry for about twelve hours; if for filleting, the fillets should then be removed and laid in a marinade of lemon-juice, a few drops of oil, pepper, salt, shredded onion, and parsley, for two or three hours. The fillets must be wiped perfectly dry on a clean cloth before using. Treated in this way they lose almost entirely the watery, wooly taste so often complained of".