Cayuga Duck

The cayuga, like the canvas-back duck, is of great size when mature. Its fine dark flesh is of better flavor than that of an ordinary wild duck, like which it should be cooked. It makes a superb salmi.

Cazanova Sauce

Mayonnaise with chopped yolks, shred whites and chopped truffles.

Cedrat (Fr)

Citron.

Celeriac

Turnip-rooted celery. Eaten raw and in salads; can be cooked as the other kind.

Puree De Celeri Rave

Cooked root-celery like mashed turnips.

Cendre (A La)

Cooked in the coals.

Cendrillons Du Filets De Soles

A French chef's specialty for a party. " Shape the fillets of soles into the semblance of babies' shoes; bako them for about ten minutes, and, when cold, cover each one carefully with a sauce chaudfroid, prepared from the bones of the fish. Decorate what represents the toe-points with a spreading of chervil very finely chopped; and, at the part usually adorned, form a knot of truffles in imitation of a bow. Dish up in a rice-stand, garnished in the center with a salade Italienne, and surrounded by croutons of fish-jelly".

Cerealine

A starchy pudding - material, made from Indian corn. Usqd same ways as arrowroot, corn starch, tapioca, etc.

Cerf (Fr)

Deer, venison.

Cerises (Fr)

Cherries.

Cervellks (Fr)

Brains.

Cervelles De Veau

Calves' brains.

Cervelles D'Agneau

Lambs' brains.

Cervelles De Moiton

Sheep's brains.

Chablis

A white wine; best kind for cooking fish.

Chafing Dishes

Metal dishes set in another dish containing hot water, a lamp underneath, for keeping meats, etc., hot.

Chalybeate

Containing iron, as iron spring-water.

Chambertin

A dinner wine. (See wines).

Chambord (A La)

Style of cooking fish, in which the fish is spread over with forcemeat and decorated, and served with Chambord garnish. Name of a part of France.

Chambord Garnish

Light sauce offish-liquor, seasoned with vegetables, wine and tomatoes strained, and mushrooms, fish quenelles, cooked oysters and truffles added.

Chambord Sauce

For fish; made of 1/2 pt. white puree of mushrooms, 1 pt. bechamel, 2 oz. lobster butter, a glass of sauterne and piece of glaze.

Champagne Cakes

Peculiar shapes of cake, like the natural divisions of an orange, made of 1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. butter, 9 eggs, 1 1/2 lbs. flour; mixed like poundcake. Stiff paper foftled in flutings like a fan, spoonfuls of the cake dropped at distances apart.

Champagne Cider

Cider bottled and kept one or two years.

Champagne Frappe

Bottles of champagne set in a pail of freezing mixture (pounded ice and salt) until thoroughly cold and beginning to freeze, like melting snow. " Mr. Henry Clair is an ingenious man. A contemporary says of him that he can frappe a bottle of champagne in five minutes. He puts into a metal wine cooler a bottle of champagne, surrounds it with alternate layers of ice and rock salt, and puts the cooler on a hot range, turns the bottle with the hands, and the rapid melting of the ice solidifies the wine at once".

Champagne Cream

Cream-colored, sort of champagne egg-nogg; yolks of eggs and powdered sugar - 5 yolks and 5 oz. to a bottle - whipped light, champagne and brandy added; half frozen, served in punch glasses.