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Modern Cookery In All Its Branches | by Eliza Acton



Embracing a series of plain and simple instructions to private families and others, for the careful and judicious preparation of evert variety of food as drawn from practical observation and experience.

TitleModern Cookery In All Its Branches
AuthorEliza Acton
PublisherJohn E. Potter
Year1860
Copyright1860, John E. Potter
AmazonLarousse Gastronomique

With Directions For Setting Out And Ornamenting The Table, Carving, Relative Duties Of Mistress And Maid To.

The Whole Carefully Revised By Mrs. S. J. Hale.

Illustrated with numerous Engravings

-Preface
In history we find frequent mention of those who have attained high position in the State, through no other virtue than superior attainments in the Art of Cookery. No title seemed too noble, or emolum...
-Table Of Weights And Measures
By which persons not having scales and weights at hand may readily measure the articles wanted to form any receipt, without the trouble of weighing. Allowance to be made for an extraordinary dryness o...
-Chapter I. Soups
Introductory Remarks The art of preparing good, wholesome, palatable soups, without great expense, which is so well understood in France, and in other countries where they form part of the daily food...
-A Few Directions To The Cook Soups
In whatever vessel soup is boiled, see that it be perfectly clean, and let the inside of the cover and the rim be equally so. Wash the meat, and prepare the vegetables with great nicety before they ar...
-How To Thicken Soups
Except for white soups, to which arrow-root is, we think, more appropriate, we prefer, to all other ingredients generally used for this purpose, the finest and freshest rice-flour, which after being p...
-How To Cook Soups
How To Fry Bread To Serve With Soup Cut some slices a quarter-inch thick, from a stale loaf; pare off the crust, and divide the bread into dice, or cut it with a deep paste-cutter into any other form...
-How To Cook Soups. Part 2
Stock For White Soup Though a Knuckle of veal is usually preferred for this stock, part of the neck will, on an emergency, answer very well. Whichever joint be chosen, let it be thoroughly washed, on...
-How To Cook Soups. Part 3
Potato Soup Mash to a smooth paste three pounds of good mealy potatoes, that have been steamed, or boiled very dry; mix with them by degrees, two quarts of boiling broth, pass the soup through a stra...
-How To Cook Soups. Part 4
Pigeon Soup Take eight pigeons, cut down two of the oldest, and put them with the necks, pinions, livers, and gizzards of the others, into four quarts of water; let it boil till the substance is extr...
-How To Make Ox-Tail Soup
An inexpensive and very nutritious soup may be made of ox-tails, but it will be insipid in flavour without the addition of a little ham, knuckle of bacon, or a pound or two of other meat. Wash and, so...
-How To Make Clear, Pale, Gravy-Soup Or Stock
Rub a deep stewpan or soup-pot with butter, and lay into it three quarters of a pound of ham freed entirely from fat, skin, and rust, four pounds of leg or neck of veal, and the same weight of lean be...
-How To Make Vermicelli Soups
How To Make Nouilles. (An Elegant Substitute For Vermicelli.) Wet, with the yolks of four eggs, as much fine, dry, sifted flour as will make them into a firm, but very smooth paste. Roll it out as th...
-How To Make Maccaroni Soup
Throw four ounces of fine fresh mellow maccaroni into a pan of fast-boiling water, with about an ounce of fresh butter, and a small onion stuck with three or four cloves. When it has swe...
-How To Make Rice Soup
In France this soup is served well thickened with the rice, which is stewed in it for upwards of an hour and a half, and makes thus, even with the common bouillon of the country, an excellent winter p...
-How To Make Mutton-Stock For Soups
Equal parts of beef and mutton, with the addition of a small portion of ham, or of very lean bacon, make excellent stock, especially for winter-soups. The necks of fowls, the bones of an undressed cal...
-How To Make Good Calf's Head Soup. (Not Expensive.)
Boil down from six to seven pounds of the thick part of a shin of beef with a little lean ham, or a slice of hung beef trimmed free from the smoky edges, should either of these last be at hand, in fiv...
-How To Make White Oyster Soup. (Or, Oyster Soup A La Reine.)
When the oysters are small, from two to three dozens for each pint of soup should be prepared, but this number can, of course, be diminished or increased at pleasure. Let the fish (which should be fin...
-How To Make Mock Turtle, Or Calf's Head Soup
After having taken out the brain and washed and soaked the head well, pour to it nine quarts of cold water, bring it gently to boil, skim it very clean, boil it, if large, an hour and a half, lift it ...
-How To Make Green Peas Soups
An Excellent Green Peas Soup Take at their fullest size, but before they are of bad colour or worm-eaten, three pints of fine large peas, and boil them as for table (see Chapter XV (Vegetables).) wit...
-How To Make Green Peas Soups. Part 2
A Cheap Green Peas Soup Wash very clean, and throw into an equal quantity of boiling water, salted as for peas, three quarts of the shells, and in from twenty to thirty minutes, when they will be qui...
-How To Make Green Peas Soups. Part 3
Common Peas Soup Wash well a quart of good split peas, and float off such as remain on the surface of the water; soak them for one night, and boil them with a bit of soda the size of a filbert in jus...
-How To Make Westerfield White Soup
Break the bone of a knuckle of veal in one or two places, and put it on to stew, with three quarts of cold water to five pounds of meat; when it has been quite cleared from scum, add to it an ounce an...
-How To Make Mullagatawny Soup
Slice, and fry gently in some good butter three or four large onions, and when they are of a fine equal amber-colour, lift them out with a slice, and put them into a deep stewpot, or large thick sauce...
-How To Boil Rice For Mullagatawny Soups, Or For Curries
The Patna, or small-grained rice, which is not so good as the Carolina for the general purposes of cookery, is the sort which ought to be served with curry. First take out the unhusked grains, then wa...
-How To Make Pheasant Or Chicken Soup
Half roast a brace of well-kept pheasants, and flour them rather thickly when they are first laid to the fire. As soon as they are nearly cold take all the flesh from the breasts, put it aside, and ke...
-How To Make Bouillon, (The Common Soup Of France. Cheap, And Very Wholesome.)
This soup, or broth, as we should perhaps designate it in England, is made once or twice in the week, in every family of respectability in France; and by the poorer classes as often as their means wil...
-Chapter II. Fish
Brine For Boiling Fish Fish is exceedingly insipid if sufficient salt be not mixed with the water in which it is boiled, but the precise quantity required for it will depend, in some measure, upon th...
-How To Choose Fish
The cook should be well acquainted with the signs of freshness and good condition in fish, as many of them are most unwholesome articles of food when stale, or out of season. The eyes should be bright...
-How To Clean Fish
Let this be done always with the most scrupulous nicety, for nothing can more effectually destroy the appetite, or disgrace the cook, than fish sent to table imperfectly cleaned. Handle it lightly, an...
-How To Keep Fish
We find that all the smaller kinds of fish keep best if emptied and cleaned as soon as they are brought in, then wiped gently as dry as they can be, and hung separately by the head on the hooks in the...
-How To Cook Turbot
How To Boil A Turbot In season all the year. A fine turbot, in full season, and well served, is one of the most delicate and delicious fish that can be sent to table ; but it is generally an expensiv...
-How To Cook Salmon
How To Broil Salmon This is a good method of dressing a small quantity of salmon for one or two persons. It may be cut in slices the whole round of the fish, each taking in two divisions of the bone;...
-How To Cook Salmon. Continued
Crimped Salmon Cut into slices an inch and a half, or two inches thick, the body of a salmon quite newly caught; throw them into strong salt and water as they are done, but do not let them soak in it...
-How To Cook Cod Fish
How To Boil Cod Fish In highest season from October to the beginning of February; in perfection about Christinas. When this fish is large, the head and shoulders are sufficient for a handsome dish, ...
-How To Cook Salt Fish
How To Boil Salt Fish When very salt and dry, this must be long-soaked before it is boiled, but it is generally supplied by the fishmongers nearly or quite ready to dress. When it is not so, lay it f...
-How To Cook Halibut
How To Boil Halibut Take a small halibut, or what you require from a large fish. Put i. into the fish-kettle, with the back of the fish undermost, cover it with cold water, in which a handful of salt...
-How To Cook Baked Soles, Halibut And Carp
Clarify from two to three ounces of fresh butter, and pour it into the dish in which the fish are to be served; add to it a little salt, some cayenne, a teaspoonful of essence of anchovies, and from o...
-How To Cook Sturgeon
How To Boil Sturgeon Take off the skin, which is very rich and oily; cut in slices; season with pepper and salt; broil over a clear fire; rub over each slice a bit of butter, and serve with no other ...
-Baked Whitings A La Francaise
Proceed with these exactly as with baked soles, page 70, or, pour a little clarified butter into a deep dish, and strew it rather thickly with finely-minced mushrooms, mixed with a teaspoonful of pars...
-How To Cook Mackerel
How To Boil Mackerel In full season in May, June, and July; may be had also in early spring. Open the fish sufficiently to admit of the insides being perfectly cleansed, but not more than is necessar...
-How To Cook Mackerel. Part 2
Fillets Of Mackerel (Fried Or Broiled.) Take off the flesh quite whole on either side, from three fine mackerel, which have been opened and properly cleaned; let it be entirely free from bone, dry it...
-How To Cook Mackerel. Part 3
Mackerel Stewed With Wine. (Very Good.) Work very smoothly together a large teaspoonful of flour with two ounces of butter, put them into a stewpan, and stir or shake them round over the fire until t...
-How To Cook Haddocks
How To Boil Haddocks In the best season in October, November, and December. Scrape the outsides very clean, open the fish, empty them, wash the insides thoroughly, take out the gills, curl the haddo...
-How To Cook Flounders
How To Boil Plaice Or Flounders Plaice in season from May to January; flounders in September, October, and November. After having emptied and well cleaned the fish, make an incision in the back as d...
-How To Cook Mullet
How To Roast, Bake, Or Broil Red Mullet In best season through the summer: may he had all the year. First wash, and then dry the fish thoroughly in a cloth, but neither scale nor open it; wrap it cl...
-How To Fry Smelts And Other Small Fish
In season from beginning of November to May. Smelts when quite fresh have a perfume resembling that of a cucumber, and a peculiarly delicate and agreeable flavour when dressed. Draw them at the gills,...
-How To Cook Shad
How To Bake A Shad Empty and wash the fish with care, but do not open it more than is necessary, and keep on the head and fins. Then stuff it with forcemeat No. 2, of Chapter VI (Forcemeats). Sew it ...
-How To Cook Trout
How To Fry Trout Clean and dry them thoroughly in a cloth, fry them plain in hot butter, or beat the white of egg on a plate, dip the trout in the egg and then in very fine bread-crumbs, which have b...
-How To Cook Perch
How To Boil Perch First wipe or wash off the slime, then scrape off the scales, which adheres rather tenaciously to this fish; empty and clean the insides perfectly, take out the gills, cut off the f...
-How To Cook Eels
How To Fry Eels In season all the year, but not so well-conditioned in April and May as in other months. First kill, then skin, empty, and wash them as clean as possible; cut them into four-inch len...
-How To Cook Lobsters
How To Boil Lobsters In season from April to October. Choose them by the directions which we have already given at the commencement of this chapter, and throw them into plenty of fast-boiling salt a...
-How To Cook Terrapins
This is a favourite dish for suppers and parties; and, when well conked, they are certainly very delicious. Many persons in Philadelphia have made themselves famous for cooking this article alone. Mrs...
-How To Cook Oysters
In season from September to April. The old-fashioned plan of feeding oysters with a sprinkling of oatmeal or flour, in addition to the salt and water to which they were committed, has long been reject...
-How To Cook Oysters. Continued
How To Scallop Oysters Large coarse oysters should never be dressed in this way. Select small plump ones for the purpose, let them be opened carefully, give them a scald in their own liquor, wash the...
-Chapter III. Gravies
Introductory Remarks Gravies are not often required either in great variety, or in abundant quantities, when only a moderate table is kept, and a clever cook will manage to supply, at a trifling cost...
-Gravies. Part 2
How To Heighten The Colour And The Flavour Of Gravies This is best done by the directions given for making Espagnole. An ounce or two of the loan of unboiled ham, cut into dice and coloured slowly in...
-Gravies. Part 3
Good Beef Or Veal Gravy. (English Receipt.) Flour and fry lightly in a bit of good butter a couple of pounds of either beef or veal; drain the meat well from the fat, and lay it into a small thick st...
-Gravies. Part 4
Sweet Sauce, Or Gravy For Venison Add to a quarter pint of common venison gravy a couple of glasses of port wine or claret, and half an ounce of sugar in lumps. Espagnole (Spanish Sauce) (a highl...
-Gravies. Part 5
Quite Common Brown Gravy Cut a sheep's melt into slices half an inch thick, flour them lightly, and either fry them a pale brown, or dissolve a small slice of butter in a thick saucepan, lay them in ...
-Gravies. Part 6
Orange Gravy, For Wild Fowl Boil for about ten minutes, in half a pint of rich and highly-flavoured brown gravy, or espagnole, half the rind of an orange, pared as thin as possible, and a small strip...
-Gravies. Part 7
Glaze This is merely strong, clear gravy or jelly boiled quickly down to the consistency of thin cream; but this reduction must be carefully managed that the glaze may be brought to the proper point ...
-Rich Pale Veal Gravy, Or, Consommee
The French, who have always at hand their stock-pot of good bouillon (beef soup or broth), make great use of it in preparing their gravies. It is added instead of water to the fresh meat, and when thi...
-Rich Deep-Coloured Veal Gravy
Lay into a large thick stewpan or saucepan, from half to three quarters of a pound of undressed ham, freed entirely from fat, and from the smoked edges, and sliced half an inch thick; on this place ab...
-Chapter IV. Sauces
Introductory Remarks The difference between good and bad cookery can scarcely be more strikingly shown than in the manner in which sauces are prepared and served. If well made, appropriate to the dis...
-Sauces. Part 2
White Roux, Or French Thickening Proceed exactly as for the preceding receipt, but dredge in the flour as soon as the butter is in full simmer, and be careful not to allow the thickening to take the ...
-Sauces. Part 3
Dutch Sauce Put into a small saucepan the yolks of three fresh eggs, the juice of a large lemon, three ounces of butter, a little salt and nutmeg, and a wineglassful of water. Hold the saucepan over ...
-Sauces. Part 4
Fennel Sauce Strip from the stems, wash very clean, and boil quickly in salt and water until it is quite tender, a handful of young fennel; press the water well from it, mince it very small, and mix ...
-Sauces. Part 5
Green Mint Sauce, For Roast Lamb The mint for this sauce should be fresh and young, for the leaves when old are tough. Strip them from the stems, wash them with great nicety, and drain them on a siev...
-Sauce Tournee, Or, Pale Thickened Gravy
Sauce tournée is nothing more than rich pale gravy made with veal or poultry (see consommée, page 85) and thickened with delicate white roux. The French give it a flavouring of mushrooms and green oni...
-How To Make Melted Butter
(a good common receipt.) Put into a basin a large teaspoonful of flour, and a little salt, then mix with them very gradually and very smoothly a quarter-pint of cold water; turn these into a small cle...
-How To Make Egg Sauces
Very Good Egg Sauce Boil four fresh eggs for quite fifteen minutes, then lay them into plenty of fresh water, and let them remain until they are perfectly cold Break the shells by rolling them on a t...
-How To Make White Sauces
English White Sauce Boil softly in half a pint of well-flavoured pale veal gravy a few very thin strips of fresh lemon-rind, for just sufficient time to give their flavour to it; stir in a thickening...
-How To Make Bread Sauce
Pour quite boiling on half a pint of the finest bread-crumbs, an equal measure of new milk; cover them closely with a plate, and let the sauce remain for twenty or thirty minutes; put it then into a d...
-How To Make Lobster Sauce
Common Lobster Sauce Add to half a pint of good melted butter, a tablespoonful of essence of anchovies, a small half-saltspoonful of freshly pounded mace, and less than a quarter one of cayenne. If a...
-How To Make Oyster Sauce
Good Oyster Sauce At the moment they are wanted for use, open three dozens of fine plump native oysters; save carefully and strain their liquor, rinse them separately in it, put them into a very clea...
-How To Make Sauce For Fish
Cream Sauce For Fish Knead very smoothly together with a strong bladed knife, a large teaspoonful of flour with three ounces of good butter; stir them in a very clean saucepan or stewpan, over a gent...
-How To Make Maitre D'Hotel Sauce
Sharp Maitre D'Hotel Sauce (English Receipt.) For a rich sauce of this kind, mix a dessertspoonful of flour with four ounces of good butter, but with from two to three ounces only for common occasion...
-How To Make Geneveve Sauce, Or Sauce Genevoise
Cut into dice three ounces of the lean of a well-flavoured ham, and put them with half a small carrot, four cloves, a blade of mace, two or three very small sprigs of lemon-thyme, and of parsley, and ...
-How To Make Hot Sauces
Sauce Piquante Brown lightly, in an ounce and a half of butter, a tablespoonful of minced eschalots, or three of onions; add a teaspoonful of flour when they are partially done; pour to them half a p...
-How To Make Christopher North's Own Sauce For Many Meats
Throw into a small basin a heaped saltspoonful of good cayenne pepper, in very fine powder, and half the quantity of salt;* add a small dessertspoonful of well-refined, pounded and sifted sugar; mix t...
-How To Make Sallad Dressing
For a salad of moderate size pound very smoothly the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs with a small teaspoonful of unmade mustard, half as much sugar in fine powder, and a saltspoonful of salt. Mix gradua...
-How To Make Mayonnaise
(a very fine sauce for cold meat, poultry, fish, or salad) Put into a large basin the yolks only of two fine and very fresh eggs, carefully freed from the germs, with a little salt and cayenne; stir t...
-How To Make Caper Sauce
Stir into the third of a pint of good melted butter from three to four dessertspoonsful of capers; add a little of the vinegar, and dish the sauce as soon as it boils. Keep it stirred after the berrie...
-How To Make Cucumber Sauce
Common Cucumber Sauce Pare, slice, dust slightly with pepper, and with flour, two or three young cucumbers, and fry them a fine brown, in a little butter, or dissolve an ounce and a half in a small s...
-How To Make Mushroom Sauce
White Mushroom Sauce Cut off the stems closely from half a pint of small button mushrooms; clean them with a little salt and a bit of flannel, and throw them into cold water, slightly salted, as they...
-How To Make Tomato Sauce
Common Tomato Sauce Tomatoes are so juicy when ripe, that they require but little liquid to reduce them to a proper consistency for sauce; and they vary so exceedingly in size and quality that it is ...
-How To Make Apple Sauce
Boiled Apple Sauce Apples of a fine cooking sort require but a very small portion of liquid to boil down well and smoothly for sauce, if placed over a gentle fire in a close-shutting saucepan, and si...
-How To Make Onion Sauce
White Onion Sauce Strip the skin from some large white onions, and after having taken off the tops and roots, cut them in two, throw them into cold water as they are done, cover them plentifully with...
-How To Make Excellent Turnip, Or Artichoke Sauce For Boiled Meat
Pare, slice, and boil quite tender, some finely-grained mild turnips, press the water from them thoroughly, and pass them through a sieve. Dissolve a slice of butter in a clean saucepan, and stir to i...
-How To Make Celery Sauce
Slice the white part of from three to five heads of young tender celery; peel it if not very young, and boil it in salt and water for twenty minutes. If for white sauce, put the celery, after it has b...
-How To Make Pudding Sauce
Sweet Pudding Sauce Boil together for fifteen minutes the thin rind of half a small lemon, an ounce and a half of fine sugar, and a wineglassful of water; then take out the lemon-peel, and mix very s...
-How To Make Parsley Sauces
Parsley-Green, For Colouring Sauces Gather a quantity of young parsley, strip it from the stalks, wash it very clean, shake it as dry as possible in a cloth, pound it in a mortar, press all the juice...
-How To Make Tartar Mustard
Tartar Mustard Rub four ounces of the best mustard very smooth with a full tea-spoonful of salt, and wet it by degrees with strong horseradish vinegar, a dessertspoonful of cayenne or of Chili vinega...
-How To Make French Batter; (For Frying Vegetables, And For Apple, Peach, Or Orange Fritters.)
Cut a couple of ounces of good butter into small bits, pour on it less than a quarter-pint of boiling water, and when it is dissolved, add three quarters of a pint of cold water, so that the whole sha...
-How To Make Bechamel Sauce
This is a fine French white sauce, now very much served at good English tables. It may be made in various ways, and more or less expensively; but it should always be thick, smooth, and rich, though de...
-Chapter V. Store Sauces
Observations A Well-selected stock of these will always prove a convenient resource for giving colour and flavour to soups, gravies, and made dishes; but unless the consumption be considerable, they ...
-Store Sauces. Continued
Potato Flour (Fecule de Pommes de terre.) Grate into a large vessel full of cold water, six pounds of sound mealy potatoes, and stir them well together. In six hours pour off the water, and add fresh...
-How To Make Mushroom Catsup
Cut the ends of the stalks from two gallons of freshly-gathered mushrooms (the large flaps are best for this purpose, but they should not be worm-eaten); break them into a deep earthen pan, and strew ...
-How To Make Walnut Catsup
The vinegar in which walnuts have been pickled, when they have remained in it a year, will generally answer all the purposes for which this catsup is required, particularly if it be drained from them ...
-How To Make Catsups
Lemon Pickle Or Catsup Either divide six small lemons into quarters, remove all the pips that are in sight, and strew three ounces of salt upon them, and keep them turned in it for a week, or, merely...
-How To Make Vinegars
Tarragon Vinegar Gather the tarragon just before it blossoms, which will be late in July, or early in August; strip it from the larger stalks, and put it into small stone jars or wide-necked bottles,...
-Chapter VI. Forcemeats
General Remarks The coarse and unpalatable compounds so constantly met with under the denomination of forcemeat, even at tables otherwise tolerably well served, show with how little attention they ar...
-Forcemeats. Part 2
No. 2. Another Good Common Forcemeat Add to four ounces of bread-crumbs two of the lean of a boiled ham, quite free from sinew, and very finely minced; two of good butter, a dessertspoonful of herbs,...
-Forcemeats. Part 3
No. 5. Oyster Forcemeat Open carefully a dozen fine plump natives, take off the beards, strain their liquor, and rinse the oysters in it. Grate four ounces of the crumb of a stale loaf into fine ligh...
-Forcemeats. Part 4
No. 8. Onion And Sage Stuffing, For Fork, Geese, Or Ducks Boil three large onions from ten to fifteen minutes, chop them small, and mix with them an equal quantity of bread-crumbs, a heaped table-spo...
-No. 10. Forcemeat Bails For Mock Turtle Soups
The French forcemeat, No. 15 of the present Chapter, is the most elegant and appropriate forcemeat to serve in mock turtle, but a more solid and highly seasoned one is usually added to it in this coun...
-No. 15. French Forcemeat Called Quenelles
This is a peculiarly light and delicate kind of forcemeat, which, by good French cooks, is compounded with exceeding care. It is served abroad in a variety of forms, and is made of very finely-grained...
-No. 16. Forcemeat For Raised And Other Cold Pies
The very finest sausage-meat, highly seasoned, and made with an equal proportion of fat and lean, is an exceedingly good forcemeat for veal, chicken, rabbit, and some few other pies; savoury herbs min...
-How To Make Panada
This is the name given to the soaked bread which is mixed with the French forcemeats, and which renders them so peculiarly delicate. Pour on the crumb of two or three rolls, or on that of any other ve...
-Chapter VII. Boiling
How To Boil Meat Large joints of meat should be neatly trimmed, washed extremely clean, and skewered or bound firmly into good shape, when they are of a nature to require it; then well covered with c...
-Roasting
Roasting, which is quite the favourite mode of dressing meat in the United States, and one, of consequence, most familiar to us, requires unremitting attention on the part of the cook, rather than any...
-Steaming
The application of steam to culinary purposes is becoming very general in our kitchens at the present day, especially in those of large establishments, many of which are furnished with apparatus for i...
-Stewing
This very wholesome, convenient, and economical mode of cookery is by no means so well understood nor profited by in England or America as on the continent, where its advantages are fully appreciated....
-Broiling
Broiling is the best possible mode of cooking and of preserving the flavour of several kinds fish, amongst which we may specify mackerel and whitings;* it is also incomparably superior to frying for s...
-Frying
This is an operation, which, though apparently very simple, requires to be more carefully and skilfully conducted than it commonly is. Its success depends principally on allowing the fat to attain the...
-Baking
The oven may be used with advantage for many purposes of cookery, for which it is not commonly put into requisition. Calves' feet, covered with a proper proportion of water, may be reduced to a strong...
-Braising
Braising is but a more expensive mode of stewing meat. The following French recipe will explain the process. We would observe, however, that the layers of beef or veal, in which the joint to be braise...
-Larding
Larding Pins. Cut into slices, of the same length and thickness, some bacon of the finest quality; trim away the outsides, place the slices evenly upon each other, and with a sharp knife divide th...
-How To Blanch Meat Or Vegetables
This is merely to throw either into a pan of boiling water for a few minutes, which gives firmness to the first, and is necessary for some modes of preparing vegetables. The breast only of a bird is ...
-Glazing
This process we have explained at the article Glaze, Chapter III (Gravies). The surface of the meat should be covered evenly, with two or three separate layers of the glaze, which, if properly made, s...
-Toasting
A very cheap apparatus, by which chops can be dressed before a clear fire, is shown by the first of these figures; and the second is pecu liarly convenient when bread or muffins are required to ...
-Chapter VIII. Beef. How To Choose Beef
If young and freshly killed, the lean of ox-beef will be smoothly grained, and of a fine, healthy, carnation-red, the fat rather white than yellow, and the suet white and firm. Heifer-beef is more clo...
-How To Roast Sirloin, Or Ribs Of Beef
Let the joint hang as long as it can possibly be kept perfectly sweet. When it is first brought in, remove the pipe of marrow which runs along the backbone, and cut out the kernels from the fat. Be ve...
-How To Roast Part Of A Round Of Beef
The natural division of the meat will show where the silver side of the round is to be separated from the upper or tongue side, which is the proper part for roasting, and which will be found equally g...
-How To Roast A Fillet Of Beef
Raise the fillet from the inside of the sirloin, or from part of it, with a sharp knife; leave the fat on, trim off the skin, lard it through, or all over, or roast it, quite plain; baste it with butt...
-How To Broil Beef Steaks
The steaks should be from half to three-quarters of an inch thick, equally sliced, and freshly cut from the middle of a well-kept, finely grained, and tender rump of beef. They should be neatly trimme...
-How To Cook Beef Steaks
Beef Steaks A La Francaise The inside of the sirloin freed from skin, and cut evenly into round quarter-inch slices, should properly be used for these; but when it cannot be obtained, part of the rum...
-How To Cook Beef Or Mutton Cake
(Very good.) Chop two pounds of lean and very tender beef or mutton, with throe quarters of a pound of beef suet; mix them well, and season them with a dessertspoonful of salt, nearly as much pounded ...
-How To Cook Beef Stew
German Stew Cut into about three-inch squares, two pounds and a half of the leaner part of the veiny piece of beef, or of any joint which is likely to be tender, and set it on to stew, with a pint an...
-How To Stew Shin Of Beef
Wash, and set it on to stew in sufficient cold water to keep it just covered until it is done. When it boils, take off the scum, and put an ounce and a quarter of salt to the gallon of water. It is us...
-Stewed Sirloin Of Beef
As a matter of convenience we have occasionally had this joint stewed instead of roasted, and have found it excellent. Cut out the inside or fillet as entire as possible, and reserve it for a separate...
-How To Stew A Rump Of Beef
This joint is more easily carved, and is of better appearance when the bones are removed before it is dressed. Roll and bind it firmly cover it with strong cold beef broth or gravy, and stew it very g...
-How To Cook Beef Palates. (Entree.)
First rub them well with salt, to take off the slime; then wash them thoroughly in several waters, and leave them to soak for half an hour before they are dressed. Set them over the fire in cold water...
-How To Cook Stewed Ox-Tails
They should be sent from the butcher ready jointed. Soak and wash them well, cut them into joints, or into lengths of two or three joints, and cover them with cold broth or water. Assoon as they boil...
-Pickle For Tongues, Beef, And Hams
How To Salt And Pickle Beef, In Various Ways Let the meat hang a couple of days in mild weather, and four or five in winter, before it is salted or pickled. During the heat of summer it is better to ...
-How To Cook Dutch, Or Hung Beef
For fourteen pounds weight of the round, the rump, or the thick flank of beef, mix two ounces of saltpetre with the same quantity of coarse sugar; rub the meat with them in every part, and let it rema...
-How To Cook Collared Beef
Only the thinnest part of the flank, or the ribs, which are not so generally used for it, will serve conveniently for collaring. The first of these should be hung in a damp place for a day or two, to ...
-How To Cook Spiced Beef
Spiced Round Of Beef. (Very Highly Flavoured.) Rub the beef well in every part with half a pound of coarse brown sugar, and let it remain two days; then reduce to powder, and mix thoroughly before th...
-A Miniature Round Of Beef
Select a fine rib of beef, and have it cut small or large in width, according to your taste; it may thus be made to weigh from five to twelve pounds, or more. Take out the bone, and wrap the meat rou...
-How To Cook Beef Roll, Or, Canellon De Boeuf. (Entree.)
Chop and mix thoroughly two pounds of lean and very tender beef, with one pound of slightly striped bacon; season them with a large teaspoonful of pepper, a little salt, a small nutmeg, or two-thirds ...
-How To Cook Beef Collops
Minced Collops Au Naturel Mince finely a pound of very tender undressed beef, free from fat or skin; season it with a moderate quantity of pepper and salt, set it over a gentle fire, and keep it stir...
-How To Cook Beef Tongues
These may be cured by any of the receipts which we have already given for pickling beef, or for those which will be found further on for hams and bacon. Some persons prefer them cured with salt and sa...
-How To Roast A Beef Heart
Wash and soak the heart very thoroughly, cut away the lobes, fill the cavities with a veal forcemeat (No. 1, page 126), secure it well with a needle and twine, or very coarse thread, and roast it at a...
-How To Cook Beef Kidney
Trim, and cut the kidney into slices; season them with salt and pepper, and dredge them well with flour; fry them on both sides, and when they are done through, lift them out, empty the pan, and make ...
-How To Cook Hash Of Beef
An Excellent Hash Of Cold Beef Put a slice of butter into a thick saucepan, and when it boils throw in a dessertspoonful of minced herbs, and an onion (or two or three eschalots) shred small: shake t...
-How To Cook Breslaw Of Beef. (Good.)
Trim the brown edges from half a pound of underdressed roast beef, shred it small, and mix it with four ounces of fine bread-crumbs, a tea-spoonful of minced parsley, and two-thirds as much of thyme, ...
-Baked Minced Beef
Mince tolerably fine, with a moderate proportion of its own fat, as much of the inside of a cold roast joint as will suffice for a dish: that which is least done is best for the purpose. Season it rat...
-How To Cook Marrow Bones
How To Boil, Marrow Bones Let the large ends of the bones be sawed by the butcher, so that when they are dished they may stand upright; and if it can be done conveniently, let them be placed in the s...
-Chapter IX. Veal. How To Choose Veal
Veal should be fat, finely grained, white, firm, and not overgrown: for when very large it is apt to be coarse and tough. It is more difficult to keep than any other meat except pork, and should never...
-How To Take The Hair From A Calf's Head With The Skin On
It is better to do this before the head is divided; but if only the half of one with the skin on can be procured, it must be managed in the same way. Put it into plenty of water which is on the point ...
-How To Cook Boiled Calf's Head
When the head is dressed with the skin on, which many persons prefer, the ear must be cut off quite close to it; it will require three quarters of an hour or upwards of additional boiling, and should ...
-Prepared Calf's Head
(the Cook's receipt.) Take away the brains and tongue from the half of a calf's head, an then remove the bones, being careful in doing so to keep the knife at close to them as possible, and to avoid p...
-Hashed Calf's Head
When the whole of this dish has to be prepared, make for it a quart of stock, and proceed, in all else as in making mock turtle soup; but after the head has been parboiled, cut down a full pound and a...
-How To Dress Cold Calf's Head Or Veal A La Maitre D'Hotel. (Good.)
(English receipt.) Cut into small delicate slices, or into scollops of equal size, sufficient cold calf's head or veal for a dish. Next knead very smoothly together with a knife two ounces of butter,...
-How To Cook Calf's Head Brawn
(author's receipt.) The half of a fine large calf's head, with the skin on, will best answer for this brawn. Take out the brains, and bone it entirely, or get the butcher to do this; rub a little fine...
-How To Cook Fillet of Veal
How To Roast A Fillet of Veal Take out the bone and put a good roll of forcemeat (No. 1, page 122) under the flap, dividing first, with a sharp knife, the skin from the meat sufficiently to admit the...
-How To Cook Loin Of Veal
Roast Loin Of Veal It is not usual to stuff a loin of veal, but we greatly recommend the practice, as an infinite improvement to the joint. Make the same forcemeat as for the fillet; and insert it be...
-How To Cook Breast Of Veal
Boiled Breast Of Veal Let both the veal and the sweetbread be washed with exceeding nicety, cover them with cold water, clear off the scum as it rises, throw in a little salt, add a bunch of parsley,...
-How To Cook Shoulder of Veal
How To Bone A Shoulder of Veal, Mutton Or Lamb Spread a clean cloth upon a table or dresser, and lay the joint flat upon it, with the skin downwards; with a sharp knife cut off the flesh from the inn...
-How To Cook Roast Neck Of Veal
The best end of the neck will make an excellent roast. A forcemeat may be inserted between the skin and the flesh, by first separating them with a sharp knife; or the dish may be garnished with the fo...
-How To Cook Knuckle Of Veal
(en Ragout.) Cut in small thick slices the flesh of a knuckle of veal, season it with a little fine salt and white pepper, flour it lightly, and fry it in butter to a pale brown, lay it into a very cl...
-How To Cook Bordyke Veal Cake. (Good.)
Take a pound and a half of veal perfectly clear of fat and skin, and eight ounces of the nicest striped bacon; chop them separately, then mix them well together with the grated rind of a small lemon, ...
-How To Cook Fricandeau Of Veal. (Entree.)
French cooks always prefer for this dish, which is a common one in their own country, that part of the fillet to which the fat or udder is attached;* but the flesh of the finer part of the neck, or lo...
-How To Make Spring-Stew Of Veal
Cut two pounds of Veal, free from fat, into small half-inch thick cutlets; flour them well, and fry them in butter with two small cucumbers sliced, sprinkled with pepper, and floured, one moderate siz...
-How To Make Norman Harrico
Brown in a stewpan, or fry lightly, after having sprinkled them with pepper, salt and flour, from two to three pounds of veal cutlets. If taken from the neck, chop the bones very short, and trim away ...
-How To Make Veal Cutlets
Take them, if possible, free from bone, and after having trimmed them into proper shape, beat them with a paste roller until the fibre of the meat is thoroughly broken; flour them well to prevent the ...
-How To Cook Sweetbreads
Sweetbreads, (Entree.) (Simply dressed.) In whatever way sweetbreads are dressed, they should first be well soaked in lukewarm water, then thrown into boiling water to blanch them, as it is called, a...
-How To Make Stewed Calf's Feet
(cheap and good.) This is an excellent family dish, highly nutritious, and often very inexpensive, as the feet, during the summer, are usually sold at a low rate. Wash them with nicety, divide them at...
-How To Cook Calf's Liver
Calf's Liver Fried To render the liver firm when dressed, lay it into a deep dish, and pour over it half a pint of vinegar; turn it often in this, and let it lie for four and twenty hours, or longer ...
-Blanquette Of Veal Or Lame, With Mushrooms. (Entree.)
Slice very thin the white part of some cold veal, divide and trim it into scallops not larger than a shilling, and lay it into a clean saucepan or stewpan. Wipe with a bit of new flannel and a few gra...
-How To Make Minced Veal
When there is neither gravy nor broth at hand, the bones and trimmings of the meat must be boiled down to furnish what is required for the mince. As cold meat is very light in weight, a pound of the w...
-How To Make Veal-Sydney. (Good.)
Pour boiling on an ounce and a half of fine bread-crumbs nearly half a pint of good veal stock or gravy, and let them stand till cool; mix with them then, two ounces of beef-suet shred very small, hal...
-How To Make Fricasseed Veal
Divide into small, thick, handsome slices of equal size, about a couple of pounds of veal, quite free from fat, bone, and skin; dissolve a couple of ounces of butter in a wide stewpan, and just as it ...
-Chapter X. Mutton. How To Choose Mutton
The best mutton is small-boned, plump, finely-grained, and short legged; the lean of a dark, rather than of a bright hue, and the fat white and clear: when this is yellow, the meat is rank, and of bad...
-How To Roast A Haunch Of Mutton
This joint should be well kept, and when the larder-accommodationa of a house are not good, the butcher should be requested to hang it the the proper time. Roast it carefully at a large sound fire, an...
-Roast Saddle Of Mutton
This is an excellent joint, though not considered a very economical one. It is usual for the butcher to raise the skin from it before it is sent in, and to skewer it on again, that in the roasting the...
-How To Roast A Leg Of Mutton
In a cool and airy larder, a leg of mutton will hang many days with advantage, if the kernel be taken out, and the flap wiped very dry when it is first brought in; and it is never tender when freshly ...
-Leg Of Mutton Boned And Forced
Turn the under-side of the mutton upwards, and with a sharp knife 11 cut through the middle of the skin from the knuckle to the first joint, and raise it from the flesh on the side along which the bon...
-How To Make Mock Venison
Hang a plump and finely-grained leg of mutton in a cool place, for as many days as it can possibly be kept without becoming altogether uneatable. Lay it on a dish, pour over, and rub well into it, abo...
-Cold Roast Leg of Mutton
When only a few slices have been cut from the middle of the joint, it will still afford a fillet of tolerable size, which, dressed in the following manner, will make a dish of better appearance and' s...
-A Fillet Of Mutton
Cut some inches from either end of a large and well-kept leg of mutton, and leave the fillet shaped like one of veal. Remove the bone, and fill the cavity with forcemeat (No. 1, page 122), which may b...
-How To Roast A Loin Of Mutton
The flesh of the loin of mutton is superior to that of the leg, when roasted; but to the frugal housekeeper this consideration is usually overbalanced by the great weight of fat attached to it; this, ...
-How To Dress A Loin Of Mutton Like Venison
Skin and bone a loin of mutton, and lay it into a stewpan, or braising-pan, with a pint of water, a large onion stuck with a dozen cloves, half a pint of port wine and a spoonful of vinegar; add, when...
-How To Cook A Shoulder Of Mutton
How To Roast A Shoulder Of Mutton Flour it well, and baste it constantly with its own dripping; do not place it close enough to the fire for the fat to be in the slightest degree burned, or even too ...
-How To Cook Mutton Cutlets
Cutlets of Cold Mutton Trim into well-shaped cutlets, which should not be very thin, the remains of a roast loin or neck of mutton, or of a quite under-dressed stewed or boiled joint; dip them into e...
-How To Make China Chilo
Mince a pound of an undressed loin or leg of mutton, with or without a portion of its fat, mix with it two or three young lettuces shred small, a pint of young peas, a teaspoonful of salt, half as muc...
-A Good Family Stew of Mutton
Put into a broad stewpan or saucepan a flat layer of mutton chops, freed entirely from fat and from the greater portion of the bone, then just dipped into cold water, seasoned with pepper, and lightly...
-How To Make An Irish Stew
Take a couple of pounds of small thick mutton cutlets with or without fat according to the taste of the persons to whom the stew is to be served; take also four pounds of good potatoes, weighed after ...
-How To Cook Mutton Kidneys
Mutton Kidneys A La Francaise. (Entree.) Skin six or eight fine fresh mutton kidneys, and, without opening them, remove the fat; slice them rather thin, strew over them a large dessertspoonful of min...
-How To Roast A Fore Quarter Of Lamb
This should be laid to a clear brisk fire, and carefully and plentifully basted from the time of its becoming warm until it is ready for table; but though it requires quick roasting, it must never be ...
-Stewed Leg Of Lamb With White Sauce. (Entree.)
Choose a small plump leg of lamb, not much exceeding five pounds in weight; put it into a vessel nearly of its size, with a few trimmings, or a bone or two of undressed veal if at hand; cover it with ...
-Chapter XI. Pork. How To Choose Pork
This meat is so proverbially, and we believe even dangerously un wholesome when ill fed, or in any degree diseased, that its quality should be closely examined before it is purchased.. When not home-f...
-How To Melt Lard
Strip the skin from the inside fat of a freshly killed and well-fed pig; slice it small and thin; put it into a new or well-scalded jar, set it into a pan of boiling water, and let it simmer over a cl...
-How To Roast A Sucking Pig
After the pig has been scalded and prepared for the spit, wipe it as dry as possible, and put into the body about half a pint of fine bread-crumbs, mixed with three heaped teaspoonsful of sage, minced...
-Baked Pig
Prepare the pig exactly as for roasting, truss, and place it in the dish in which it is to be sent to the oven, and anoint it thickly in every part with white of egg which has been slightly beaten: it...
-How To Roast Pork
When the skin is left on the joint which is to be roasted, it must be scored in narrow strips of equal width, before it is put to the fire, and laid at a considerable distance from it at first, that t...
-How To Broil Or Fry Fork Cutlets
Cut them about half an inch thick from a delicate loin of pork, trim them into neat form, and take off part of the fat, or the whole of it when it is not liked; dredge a little pepper or cayenne upon ...
-Cobbett's Receipt Por Curing Bacon
(extracted from his Cottage Economy) All other parts being taken away, the two sides that remain, and which are called flitches, are to be cured for bacon. They are first rubbed with salt on their ...
-A Genuine Yorkshire Receipt For Curing Hams And Bacon
Let the swine be put up to fast for twenty-four hours before they are killed (and observe that neither a time of severe frost nor very damp weather is favourable for curing bacon). After a pig has be...
-Kentish Mode Of Cutting Up And Curing A Pig
To a porker of sixteen stone Kentish weight, (that is to say, eight pounds to the stone, or nine stone two pounds of common weight,) allow two gallons of salt, two pounds of saltpetre, one pound of co...
-French Bacon For Larding
Cut the bacon from the pig with as little lean to it as possible. Rub it well in every part, with salt which has been dried, reduced to powder, and sifted; put the layers of bacon close against and up...
-How To Pickle Cheeks Of Bacon And Hams
One pound of common salt, one pound of the coarsest sugar, and one ounce of saltpetre, in fine powder, to each stone (fourteen pounds) of the meat will answer this purpose extremely well. An ounce of ...
-Rams Superior To Westphalia
Take the hams as soon as the pig is sufficiently cold to be cut up, rub them well with common salt, and leave them for three days to drain; throw away the brine, and for a couple of hams of from fifte...
-How To Cook Hams
(Bordyke Receipt.) After the hams have been rubbed with salt, and well drained from the brine, according to our previous directions, take, for each fourteen pounds weight of the pork, one ounce of sal...
-How To Cook Bacon
How To Boil Bacon When very highly salted and dried, it should he soaked for an hour before it is dressed. Scrape and wash it well, cover it plentifully with cold water, let it both heat and boil slo...
-Tonbridge Brawn
Split open the head of a middling-sized porker, remove the. brain and all the bones, strew the inside rather thickly with fine salt, and let it drain until the following day. Cleanse the ears and feet...
-Italian Pork Cheese
Chop, not very fine, one pound of lean pork with two pounds of the inside fat; strew over and mix thoroughly with them three teaspoonsful of salt, nearly half as much pepper, a half-teaspoonful of mix...
-How To Make Pork Sausages
Sausage-Meat Cake, Or, Pain De Porc Frais Season very highly from two to three pounds of good sausage-meat, both with spices and with sage, or with thyme and parsley, if these be preferred; press the...
-How To Make Pork Sausages. Continued
Pounded Sausage-Meat. (Very Good.) Take from the best end of a neck of veal, or from the fillet or loin, a couple or more pounds of flesh without any intermixture of fat or skin; chop it small, and p...
-Chapter XII. Poultry. How To Choose Poultry
Young, plump, well-fed, but not over-fatted poultry is the best. The skin of fowls and turkeys should be clear, white, and finely grained, the breasts broad and full-fleshed, the legs smooth, the toes...
-How To Bone A Fowl Or Turkey Without Opening It
After the fowl has been drawn and singed, wipe it inside and out with a clean cloth, but do not wash it. Take off the head, cut through the skin all round the first joint of the legs, and pull them fr...
-How To Roast A Turkey
In very cold weather a turkey in its feathers will hang (in an airy larder) quite a fortnight with advantage; and, however fine a quality of bird it may be, unless sufficiently long kept, it will prov...
-How To Boil A Turkey
A delicate but plump hen-turkey of moderate size should be selected for boiling. Pick and draw it, using the greatest precaution not to break the gall bladder; singe it with writing paper, take off th...
-Turkey A La Flamande, Or, Dinde Poudree
Prepare as for boiling a fine well-kept hen turkey; wipe the inside thoroughly with a dry cloth, but do not wash it; throw in a little salt to draw out the blood, let it remain a couple of hours or mo...
-How To Roast A Goose
After it has been picked and singed with care, put into the body of the goose two parboiled onions of moderate size, finely chopped, and mixed with half an ounce of minced sage-leaves, a saltspoonful ...
-How To Roast A Fowl
Strip off the feathers, and carefully pick every stump or plug from the skin, as nothing can be more uninviting than the appearance of any kind of poultry where this has been neglected, nor more indic...
-Fowl A La Carlsfort. (Entree.)
Bone a fowl without opening the back, and restore it to its original form by filling the vacant spaces in the legs and wings with forcemeat; put a roll of it also into the body, and a large sausage on...
-Boiled Fowls
Fowls trussed for Boiling. White-legged poultry should always be selected for boiling, as they are of better colour when dressed than any others. Truss them firmly and neatly, with the legs drawn ...
-How To Broil A Chicken Or Fowl
Either of these, when merely split and broiled, is very dry and unsavoury eating; but will be greatly improved if first boiled gently from five to ten minutes and left to become cold, then divided, di...
-Fricasseed Fowls Or Chickens. (Entree.)
To make a fricassee of good appearance without great expense, prepare, with exceeding nicety, a couple of plump chickens, strip off the skin, and carve them very neatly. Reserve the wings, breasts, me...
-How To Make Chicken Cutlets. (Entree.)
Skin, and cut into joints, one or two young chickens, and remove the bones with care from the breasts, merrythoughts, and thighs, which are to be separated from the legs. Mix well together a teaspoonf...
-How To Make Cutlets Of Fowls, Partridges, Or Pigeons. (Entree.)
(French Receipt.) Take closely off the flesh of the breast and wing together, on either side of the bone, and when you have thus raised the large fillets, as they are called, from three birds, which ...
-How To Make Fried Chicken A La Malabar. (Entree.)
This is an Indian dish. Cut up the chicken, wipe it dry, and rub it well with curry-powder, mixed with a little salt; fry it in a bit of butter, taking care that it is of a nice light brown. In the me...
-How To Make Hashed Fowl. (Entree.)
After having taken off, in joints, as much of a cold fowl or fowls as will suffice for a dish, bruise the bodies with a paste roller, pour to them a pint of water, and boil them for an hour and a half...
-How To Make Minced Fowl
(entree.) (French Receipt.) Raise from the bones all the more delicate parts of the flesh of either cold roast, or cold boiled fowls, clear it from the skin, and keep it covered from the air until wan...
-How To Make Cold Fowls, En Friture
Cut into joints, and take the skin from some cold fowls, lay them into a deep dish, strew over them a little fine salt and cayenne, add the juice of a lemon, and let them remain for an hour, moving th...
-How To Make Scallops Of Fowl, Au Bechamel. (Entree.)
Raise the flesh from a couple of fowls,, as directed for cutlets in the foregoing receipt, and take it as entire as possible from either side of the breast; strip off the skin, lay the fillets flat, a...
-How To Roast Ducks
In preparing these for the spit, be careful to clear the skin entirely from the stumps of the feathers; take off the, heads and necks, but leave the feet on, and hold them for a few minutes in boiling...
-How To Make Stewed Duck. (Entree.)
A couple of quite young ducks, or a fine full-grown, but still tender one, will be required for this dish. Cut either down neatly into joints, and arrange them, in a single layer if possible, in a wid...
-How To Roast Pigeons
These, as we have already said, should be dressed while they are very fresh. If extremely young they will be ready in twelve hours for the spit, otherwise, in twenty-four. Take off the heads and necks...
-Chapter XIII. Game. How To Choose Game
Buck venison, which is in season only from June to Michaelmas, is considered finer than doe venison, which comes into the market in October, and remains in season through November and December: neithe...
-How To Roast A Haunch Of Venison
To give venison the flavour and the tenderness so much prized by epicures, it must be well kept; and by taking the necessary precautions, it will hang a considerable time without detriment. Wipe it wi...
-How To Stew A Shoulder Of Venison
Bone the joint, by the directions given for a shoulder of veal or mutton (see page 166); flatten it on a table, season it well with cayenne, salt, and pounded mace, mixed with a very small proportion ...
-How To Bash Venison
For a superior hash of venison, add to three quarters of a pint of strong thickened brown gravy, Christopher North's sauce, in the proportion directed for in the receipt of page 102. Cut the venison i...
-How To Roast A Hare
After the hare has been skinned, or cased, as it is called, wash it very thoroughly in cold water, and afterwards in warm. If in any degree overkept, or musty in the inside, which it will sometimes be...
-How To Roast A Rabbit
This, like a hare, is much improved by having the back-bone taken out, and the directions we have given will enable the cook, with very little practice, to remove it without difficulty. Line the insid...
-How To Roast Partridges
Let the birds hang as long as they can possibly be kept without becoming offensive; pick them carefully, draw, and singe them; wipe the insides thoroughly with a clean cloth; truss them with the head ...
-How To Make Partridges With Mushrooms
For a brace of young well-kept birds, prepare from half to three quarters of a pint of mushroom-buttons, or very small flaps, as for pickling Dissolve over a gentle fire an ounce and a half of butter,...
-How To Make Broiled Partridge
(Breakfast dish.) Split a young and well-kept partridge, and wipe it with a soft clean cloth inside and out, but do not wash it; broil it delicately over a very clear fire, sprinkling it with a littl...
-How To Roast Small Birds
The most delicate of these are larks, which are in high season in November and December. When cleaned and prepared for roasting, brush them with the yolk of an egg, and roll in bread crumbs; 'spit the...
-A Salmi Of Moor Fowl, Pheasants, Or Partridges. (Entree.)
This is an elegant mode of serving the remains of roasted game, but when a superlative salmi is desired, the birds must be scarcely more than half roasted for it. In either case, carve them very neatl...
-How To Roast Canvass-Back Ducks
Let your duck be young and fat, if possible; having picked it well, draw it and singe carefully, without washing it, so as to preserve the blood, and consequently, all its flavour. You then truss it, ...
-How To Roast Woodcocks Or Snipes
Handle them as little and as lightly as possible, and pluck off the feathers gently; for if this be violently done the skin of the birds will be broken. Do not draw them, but after having wiped them w...
-Chapter XIV. Curries
The great superiority of the oriental curries over those generally prepared in Europe or America, is not, we believe, altogether the result of a want of skill or of experience on the part of our cooks...
-Mr. Arnott's Curry
Take the heart of a cabbage, and nothing but the heart, that is to say, pull away all the outside leaves until it is about the size of an egg; chop it fine, add to it a couple of apples sliced thin, ...
-How To Make A Bengal Curry
Slice and fry three large onions in two ounces of butter, and lift them out of the pan when done. Put into a stewpan three other large onions and a small clove of garlic which have been pounded togeth...
-How To Make A Common Indian Curry
For each pound of meat, whether veal, mutton, or beef, take a heaped tablespoonful of good curry powder, a small teaspoonful of salt, and one of flour; mix these well together, and after having cut do...
-How To Make Curried Sweetbreabs
Wash and soak them as usual, then throw them into boiling water with a little salt in it, and a whole onion, and let them simmer for ten minutes; or, if at hand, substitute weak veal broth for the wat...
-How To Make Curried Oysters
Let a hundred of large sea-oysters he opened into a basin, without losing one drop of their liquor. Put a lump of fresh butter into a good-sized saucepan, and when it boils, add a large onion, cut in...
-How To Make Curried Gravy
The quantity of onion, eschalot, or garlic used for a curry should be regulated by the taste of the persons for whom it is prepared; the very large proportions of them which are acceptable to some eat...
-How To Make Potted Meats
Any tender and well-roasted meat, taken free of fat, skin, and gristle, as well as from the dry outsides, will answer for potting admirably, better, indeed, than that which is generally baked for the ...
-How To Make Potted Ham
(an excellent Receipt.) To be eaten in perfection this should be made with a freshly cured ham, which, after having been soaked for twelve hours, should be wiped dry, nicely trimmed, closely wrapped i...
-How To Make Potted Ox-Tongue
Boil tender an unsmoked tongue of good flavour, and the following day cut from it the quantity desired for potting, or take for this purpose the remains of one which has already been served at table. ...
-Chapter XV. Vegetables
The quality of vegetables depends much both on the soil in which they are grown, and on the degree of care bestowed upon their culture; but if produced in ever so great perfection, their excellence wi...
-Vegetables. Continued
Boiled Leeks Trim off the coarser leaves from some young leeks, cut them into equal lengths, tie them into small bunches, and boil them in plenty of water which has been previously salted and skimmed...
-How To Boil Potatoes. (A Genuine Irish Receipt.)
Potatoes, to boil well together, should be all of the same sort, and as nearly equal in size as may be. Wash off the mould, and scrub them very clean with a hard brush, but neither scoop nor apply a k...
-How To Cook Potatoes
How To Roast Or Bake Potatoes Scrub, and wash exceedingly clean, some potatoes nearly assorted in size; wipe them very dry, and roast them in a Dutch oven before the fire, placing them at a distance ...
-How To Cook Potatoes. Continued
English Potato-Balls Boil some floury potatoes very dry, mash them as smoothly as possible, season them well with salt and white pepper; warm them with about an ounce of butter to the pound, or rathe...
-How To Cook Spinach
Spinach Entremets (French Receipt.) Pick the spinach leaf by leaf from the stems, and wash it in abundance of spring water, changing it several times; then shake it in a dry cloth held by the four co...
-How To Cook Asparagus
How To Boil Asparagus With a sharp knife scrape the stems of the asparagus lightly, but very clean, from within one to two inches of the green tender points, throw them into cold water as they are do...
-How To Cook Green Peas
How To Boil Green Peas To be eaten in perfection these should be young, very freshly gathered, and shelled just before they are boiled; should there be great inequality in their size, the smaller one...
-How To Cook French Or String Beans
How To Boil French Or String Beans When the beans are very small and young, merely take off the ends and stalks, and drop them into plenty of spring water as they are done; when all are ready wash an...
-How To Cook Cucumbers
Dressed Cucumbers Pare and slice them very thin, strew a little fine salt over them, and when they have stood a few minutes drain off the water, by raising one side of the dish, and letting it flow t...
-How To Make Vegetable Salads
The herbs and vegetables for a salad cannot be too freshly gathered; they should be carefully cleared from insects and washed with scrupulous nicety; they are better when not prepared until near the t...
-How To Cook Cauliflowers
How To Boil Cauliflowers Trim off the outside leaves, and cut the stems quite close to the cauliflowers; let them lie for an hour in plenty of cold water, with a handful of salt in it, to draw out an...
-How To Boil Artichokes
After they have been soaked and well washed, cut off the stems quite close, trim away a few of the lower leaves, and clip the points of all; throw the artichokes into plenty of fast boiling water, rea...
-How To Cook Tomatoes
Tomatoes En Salade These are now often served in England in the American fashion, merely sliced, and dressed like cucumbers, with salt, pepper, oil, and vinegar. For various other American modes of p...
-How To Cook Mushrooms
Mushrooms Au Beurre (delicious.) Cut the stems from some fine meadow mushroom-buttons, and clean them with a bit of new flannel and some fine salt, then either wipe them dry with a soft cloth, or rin...
-How To Boil Sprouts, Cabbages, Savoys, Lettuces, Or Endive
All green vegetables should be thrown into abundance of fast-boiling water ready salted and skimmed, with the addition of the morsel of soda which we have recommended, in a previous page of this chapt...
-How To Cook Turnips
How To Boil Turnips Pare entirely from them the stringy rind, and either split the turnips once or leave them whole; throw them into boiling water slightly salted, and keep them closely covered from ...
-How To Cook Carrots
How To Boil Carrots Wash the mould from them, and scrape the skin off lightly with the edge of a sharp knife, or, should this be objected to, pare them as thin and as equally as possible; in either c...
-How To Cook Parsnips
How To Boil Parsnips These are dressed in precisely the same manner as carrots, but require much less boiling. According to their quality and the time of year, they will take from twenty minutes to n...
-How To Cook Jerusalem Artichokes
Jerusalem Artichokes Wash the artichokes, pare them quickly, and throw them as they are done into a saucepan of cold water, or of equal parts of milk and water; and when they are about half boiled ad...
-How To Cook Haricots Blancs
The haricot blanc is the seed of a particular kind of French bean, of which we find some difficulty in ascertaining the English name, for though we have tried several which resemble it in appearance, ...
-How To Cook Beet Root
How To Boil Beet Root Wash the roots delicately clean, but neither scrape nor cut them, as not a fibre even should be trimmed away, until after they are dressed. Throw them into boiling water, and ac...
-How To Cook Celery
Boiled Celery This vegetable is extremely good dressed like sea-kale, and served on a toast with rich melted butter. Let it be freshly dug, wash it with great nicety, trim the ends, take off the coar...
-How To Cook Onions
Stewed Onions Strip the outer skin from four or five fine Portugal onions, and trim the ends, but without cutting into the vegetable; arrange them in a saucepan of sufficient size to contain them all...
-Chapter XVI. Pastry
Introductory Remarks The greatest possible cleanliness and nicety should be observed in making pastry. The slab or board, paste-rollers, tins, cutters, stamps, everything, in fact, used for it, and e...
-How To Glaze Or Ice Pastry
The fine yellow glaze appropriate to meat pies is given with beaten yolk of egg, which should be laid on with a paste brush, or a small bunch of feathers: if a lighter colour be wished for, whisk the ...
-Feuilletage, Or Fine French Puff Paste
This, when made by a good French cook, is the perfection of rich light crust, and will rise in the oven from one to six inches in height, but some practice is, without doubt, necessary to accomplish t...
-Very Good Light Paste
Mix with a pound of sifted flour six ounces of fresh, pure lard, and make them into a smooth paste with cold water; press the buttermilk from ten ounces of butter, and form it into a ball, by twisting...
-English Puff-Paste
Break lightly into a couple of pounds of dried and sifted flour, eight ounces of butter; add a pinch of salt, and sufficient cold water to make the paste; work it as quickly and as lightly as possible...
-Cream Crust. (Very Good.)
Stir a little fine salt into a pound of dry flour, and mix gradually with it sufficient very thick, sweet cream to form a smooth paste; it will be found sufficiently good for common family dinners, wi...
-Pate Brisee, Or French Crust For Hot Or Cold Meat-Pies
Sift two pounds and a quarter of fine dry flour, and break into it one pound of butter, work them together with the fingers until they resemble fine crumbs of bread, then add a small teaspoonful of sa...
-Flead Crust
Flead is the provincial name for the leaf, or inside fat of a pig, which makes excellent crust when fresh, much finer, indeed, than after it is melted into lard. Clear it quite from skin, and slice it...
-Common Suet-Crust For Pies
In many families this is preferred both for pies and tarts, to crust made with butter, as being much more wholesome; but it should never be served unless especially ordered, as it is to some persons p...
-Brioche Paste
The brioche is a rich, light kind of unsweetened bun, or cake, very commonly sold, and served to all classes of people in France, where it is made in great perfection by good cooks and pastry-cooks. I...
-Modern Potato Pasty. (An Excellent Family Dish.)
A tin mould of the construction shown in the plate, with a perforated moveable top, and a small valve to allow the escape of the steam, must be had for this pasty, which is an excellent family dish, a...
-Modern Chicken Pie
Skin, and cut down into joints a couple of fowls, take out all the bones, and season the flesh highly with salt, cayenne, pounded mace, and nutmeg; line a dish with a thin paste, and spread over it a ...
-Pigeon Pie
Border a large dish with fine puff-paste, and cover the bottom with a veal cutlet, or tender rump steak, free from fat and bone, and seasoned with salt, cayenne, and nutmeg, or pounded mace; prepare w...
-Beef-Steak Pie
From a couple to three pounds of rump-steak will be sufficient for a good family pie. It should be well kept though perfectly sweet, for in no form can tainted meat be more offensive than when it is e...
-Mutton Pie
A pound and a quarter of flour will make sufficient paste for a mode-rate-r.ized pie, and two pounds of mutton freed from the greater portion of the fat will fill it. Butter a dish, and line it with a...
-Raised Pies
These may be made of any size, and with any kind of meat, poultry, or game, but the whole must be entirely free from bone. When the crust is not to be eaten, it is made simply with a few ounces of lar...
-A Vol-Au-Vent. (Entree.)
This dish can be successfully made only with the finest and lightest puff-paste (see feuilletage, page 250), as its height, which ought to be from four to five inches, depends entirely on its rising i...
-Oyster-Patties. (Entree.)
Line some small patty-pans with fine puff-paste, rolled thin and to preserve their form-when baked, put a bit of bread into each; lay on the covers, pinch and trim the edges, and send the patties to a...
-Good Chicken Patties. (Entree)
Raise the white flesh entirely from a young undressed fowl, divide it once or twice, and lay it into a small clean saucepan, in which about an ounce of butter has been dissolved, and just begins to si...
-Excellent Meat Rolls
Pound, as for potting (see page 227), and with the same proportion of bolter and of seasonings, some half-roasted veal, chicken, or turkey. Make some forcemeat by the receipt No. 1, Chapter VI (Forcem...
-Patties, Tartlets, Or Small Vols-Au-Vents
These are quickly and easily made with two round paste-cutters, of which one should be little more than half the size of the other: to give the pastry a better appearance, they should be fluted. Roll ...
-A Sefton, Or Veal Custard
Pour boiling, a pint of rich, clear, pale veal gravy on six fresh eggs, which have been well beaten and strained: sprinkle in directly the grated rind of a fine lemon, a. little cayenne, some salt if ...
-Apple Cake, Or German Tart
Work together with the fingers ten ounces of butter and a pound of flour, until they resemble fine crumbs of bread; throw in a small pinch of salt, and make them into a firm smooth paste with the yolk...
-Tourte Meringuee, Or Tart With Royal Icing
Lay a band of fine paste round the rim of a tart-dish, fill it with any kind of fruit mixed with a moderate proportion of sugar, roll out the cover very evenly, moisten the edges of the paste, press t...
-A Good Apple Tart
A pound and a quarter of apples, weighed after they are pared and cored, will be sufficient for a small tart, and four ounces more for one of moderate size. Lay a border of English puff-paste, or of c...
-Barberry Tart
Barberries, with half their weight of fine brown sugar, when they are thoroughly ripe, and with two ounces more when they are not quite so, make an admirable tart. For one of moderate size, put into a...
-Almond Paste
For a single dish of pastry, blanch seven ounces of fine sweet almonds and one of bitter; throw them into cold water as they are done, and let them remain in it for an hour or two; then wipe, ...
-How To Make Mince Pies
Mincemeat. (Author's Receipt.) To one pound of an unsalted ox-tongue, boiled tender and cut free from the rind, add two pounds of fine stoned raisins, two of beef kidney-suet, two pounds and a half o...
-The Monitor's Tart, Or Tourte A La Judd
Put into a German enamelled stewpan, or into a delicately clean saucepan, three quarters of a pound of well-flavoured apples, weighed after they are pared and cored; add to them from three to four oun...
-Pudding Pies. (Entremets.)
This form of pastry (or its name at least) is, we believe, peculiar to the county of Kent, where it is made in abundance, and eaten by all classes of people during Lent. Boil for fifteen minutes three...
-Cocoa-Nut Cheese-Cakes
(entremets.) (Jamaica Receipt.) Break carefully the shell of the nut, that the liquid it contains may not escape. Take out the kernel, wash it in cold water, pare thinly off the dark skin, and...
-Lemon Cheese-Cakes, (Entremets.) (Christ-Church-College Receipt.)
Rasp the rind of a large lemon with four ounces of fine sugar, then crush, and mix it with the yolks of three eggs, and half the quantity of whites, well whisked; beat these together thoroughly; add t...
-Common Lemon Tartlets
Beat four eggs until they are exceedingly light, add to them gradually four ounces of pounded sugar, and whisk these together for five minutes; strew lightly in, if it be at hand, a dessertspoonful of...
-Creme Patissiere, Or Pastry Cream
To one ounce of fine flour add, very gradually, the beaten yolks of three fresh eggs ; stir to them briskly, and in small portions at first, three-quarters of a pint of boiling cream, or of cream and ...
-Fanchonnettes. (Entremets.)
Roll out very thin and square some fine puff-paste, lay it on a tin or copper oven-leaf, and cover it equally to within something less than an inch of the edge with peach or apricot jam; roll a second...
-Chapter XVII. Boiled Puddings
General Directions All the ingredients for puddings should be fresh and of good quality. It is a false economy to use for them such as have been too long stored, as the slightest degree of mustiness ...
-Boiled Puddings. Part 2
A Lie, Or Ley, For Washing Pudding-Cloths To a pint of wood-ashes pour three quarts of boiling water, and either wash the cloths in the mixture without straining it, or give them two or three minutes...
-Boiled Puddings. Part 3
Butter Crust For Puddings When suet is disliked for crust, butter must supply its place, but there must be no intermixture of lard in paste which is to be boiled. Eight ounces to the pound of flour w...
-Beef-Steak Pudding
Small Beef-Steak Pudding Make into a very firm, smooth paste, one pound of flour, six ounces of beef-suet, finely minced, half a teaspoonful of salt, and half a pint of cold water. Line with this a b...
-Batter Pudding
Common Batter Pudding Beat four eggs thoroughly, mix with them half a pint of milk, and pass them through a sieve, add them by degrees to half a pound of flour, and when the batter is perfectly smoot...
-Apple, Currant, Cherry, Or Other Fresh Fruit Pudding
Make a paste as for a beaf-steak pudding, either with suet or butter; lay into a. basin a well-floured cloth, which has been dipped into hot water, wrung dry, and shaken out; roll the paste thin, pres...
-A Common Apple Pudding
Make a light crust with one pound of flour and six ounces of very finely minced beef-suet, roll it thin, and fill it with one pound and a quarter of good boiling apples; add the grated rind and strain...
-The Publisher's Pudding
This pudding can scarcely be made too rich. First blanch, and then beat to the smoothest possible paste, six ounces of fresh sweet almonds, and a dozen bitter ones; pour very gradually to them, in the...
-Custard Pudding
Small Custard Pudding. (Aldeburgh White Lion Receipt.) Dissolve in half a pint of new milk a dessertspoonful of pounded sugar and pour it to three well-beaten eggs; strain the mixture into a buttered...
-German Pudding, And Sauce
Stew, until very tender and dry, three ounces of whole rice in a pint and a quarter of milk; when a little cooled, mix with it three ounces of beef-suet, finely chopped, two ounces and a half of sugar...
-Miss Bremer's Pudding
Blanch, dry, and beat to the smoothest possible paste, half a pound of fresh Jordan almonds and five or six bitter ones; and moisten them as they are done with a few drops of water, or a little white ...
-Very Good Raisin Pudding
To three quarters of a pound of flour add four ounces of fine crumbs of bread, one pound of beef-suet, a pound and six ounces of raisins, weighed after they are stoned, a quarter-teaspoonful of salt, ...
-Pudding A La Scoones
Take of apples finely minced, and of currants, six ounces each; of suet, chopped small, sultana raisins, picked from the stalks, and sugar, four ounces each, with three ounces of fine bread-crumbs, th...
-Small Light Plum Pudding
Put half a pint of fine bread crumbs into a basin, and pour on them a quarter-pint of boiling milk; put a plate over, and let them soak for half an hour; then mix with them half a pint of suet chopped...
-Vegetable Plum Pudding
(Cheap and good.) Mix well together one pound of smoothly-mashed potatoes, half a pound of carrots boiled quite tender, and beaten to a paste, one pound of flour, one of currants, and one of raisins (...
-An Excellent Shall Mincemeat Pudding
Pour on an ounce of bread-crumbs, sufficient boiling milk to soak them well; when they are nearly cold drain as much of it from them as you can, and mix them thoroughly with half a pound of mincemeat,...
-Christmas Pudding
Cottage Christmas Pudding A pound and a quarter of flour, fourteen ounces of suet, a pound and a quarter of stoned raisins, four ounces of currants, five of sugar, a quarter-pound of potatoes smoothl...
-Rolled Pudding
Roll out thin a bit of light puff paste, or a good suet crust, and spread equally over it to within an inch of the edge, any kind of fruit jam. Orange marmalade and mincemeat make excellent varieties ...
-Bread Pudding
Sweeten a pint of new milk with three ounces of fine sugar, throw in a few grains of salt, and pour it boiling on half a pound of fine, and lightly-grated bread-crumbs; add an ounce of fresh butter, a...
-Boiled Rice Pudding
A Good Boiled Rice Pudding Swell gradually,* and boil until quite soft and thick, four ounces and a half of whole rice in a pint and a half of new milk; sweeten them with from three to four ounces of...
-Tomato Dumplings, Or Puddings
(an American Receipt.) In the manner of composition, mode of cooking, and saucing, the good housewife must proceed in the same way as she would for an apple dumpling, with this exception, care must b...
-Snow-Balls
Orange Snow-Balls Take out the unhusked grains, and wash well half a pound of rice; put it into plenty of water, and boil it rather quickly for ten minutes; drain and let it cool. Pare four large, or...
-Dumplings
Fashionable Apple Dumplings These are boiled in small knitted or closely-netted cloths (the former have, we think, the prettiest effect), which give quite an ornamental appearance to an otherwise hom...
-Chapter XVIII. Baked Puddings
Introductory Remarks We have little to add here to the remarks which will be found at the commencement of the preceding Chapter, as they will apply equally to the preparation of these and of boiled p...
-The Printer's Pudding
Grate very lightly six ounces of the crumb of a stale loaf, and put it into a deep dish. Dissolve in a quart of cold new milk four ounces of good Lisbon sugar; add it to five large, well-whisked eggs;...
-Almond Pudding
On two ounces of fine white bread-crumbs pour a pint of boiling cream, and let them remain until nearly cold, then mix them very gradually with half a pound of sweet and six bitter almonds pounded to ...
-Lemon Pudding
An Excellent Lemon Pudding Beat well together four ounces of fresh butter, creamed, and eight of sifted sugar; to these add gradually the yolks of six and the whites of two eggs, with the grated rind...
-Bakewell Pudding
This pudding is famous not only in Derbyshire, but in several other English counties, where it is usually served on all holiday-occasions. Line a shallow tart-dish with quite an inch-deep layer of sev...
-The Elegant Economist's Pudding
The Elegant Economist's Boiled Pudding Butter thickly a plain mould or basin, and line it entirely with slices of cold plum or raisin pudding, cut so as to join closely and neatly together; fill it q...
-Rich Bread And Butter Pudding
Give a good flavour of lemon-rind and bitter almonds, or of cinnamon, if preferred, to a pint of new milk, and when it has simmered a sufficient time for this, strain and mix it with a quarter-pint of...
-A Good Baked Bread Pudding
Pour, quite boiling, on six ounces (or three quarters of a pint) of fine bread-crumbs and one ounce of butter, a pint of new milk, cover them closely, and let them stand until the bread is well soaked...
-Sutherland Or Castle Puddings
Take an equal weight of eggs in the shell, of good butter, of fino dry flour, and of sifted sugar. First, whisk the eggs for ten minutes, or until they appear extremely light; then throw in the sugar ...
-Madeleine Puddings
(to be served cold.) Take the same ingredients as for the Sutherland pudddings, but clarify an additional ounce of butter; skim, and then fill some round tin pattypans with it almost to the brim, pour...
-A French Rice Pudding, Or Gateau De Riz
Swell gently in a quart of new milk, or in equal parts of milk and cream, seven ounces of the best Carolina rice, which has been cleared of the discoloured grains, and washed and drained; when it is t...
-Baked Rice Pudding
A Common Rice Pudding Throw six ounces of rice into plenty of cold water, and boil it gently from eight to ten minutes; drain it well in a sieve or strainer, and put it into a clean saucepan with a q...
-Potato Pudding
With a pound and a quarter of fine mealy potatoes, boiled very dry, and mashed perfectly smooth while hot, mix three ounces of butter, five and a half of sugar, five eggs, a few grains of salt, and th...
-Baked Apple Pudding
Baked Apple Pudding, Or Custard Weigh a pound of good boiling apples after they are pared and cored, and stew them to a perfectly smooth marmalade, with six ounces of sugar, and a spoonful or two of ...
-Vermicelli Pudding
Drop lightly into a pint and a half of boiling milk four ounces of fresh vermicelli, and keep it simmering and stirred gently for ten minutes, when it will have become very thick; then mix with it thr...
-Small Cocoa-Nut Puddings
Melt together over a slow fire two ounces of fresh butter cut small, and four of pounded sugar; pour them out when they have boiled for a couple of minutes, and let them cool; mix with them two ounces...
-Good Yorkshire Pudding
To make a very good and light Yorkshire pudding, take an equa. number of eggs and of heaped tablespoonsful of flour, with a teaspoonful if salt to six of these. Whisk the eggs well, strain, and mix th...
-Normandy Pudding. (Good.)
Boil, until very soft and dry, eight ounces of rice in a pint and a half, or rather more, of water,* stir to it two ounces of fresh butter, and three of sugar, and simmer it for a few minutes after th...
-Damson-And-Rice Pudding
With five ounces of whole rice boiled soft and dry, mix an ounce of butter, ten ounces of damson-jam, a teaspoonful of lemon-juice, and five eggs. Beat the whole well together, and bake it about half ...
-Raisin Pudding
Common Raisin Pudding Beat well together three quarters of a pound of flour, the same quantity of raisins, six ounces of beef-suet, finely chopped, a small pinch of salt, some grated nutmeg, and thre...
-Poor Author's Pudding
Flavour a quart of new milk by boiling in it for a few minutes half a stick of well-bruised cinnamon, or the thin rind of a small lemon; add a few grains of salt, and three ounces of sugar, and turn t...
-Pudding A La Paysanne
(cheap and good.) Fill a deep tart-dish with alternate layers of well-sugared fruit, and very thin slices of the crumb of a light stale loaf; let the upper layer be of fruit, and should it be of a dry...
-Indian Pudding
Put into a deep dish from six to eight ounces of rice which has been washed, and wiped in a dry cloth; just moisten it with milk, and set it into a gentle oven; add milk to it at intervals, in small q...
-Baked Hasty Pudding
Take from a pint of new milk sufficient to mix into a thin batter two ounces of flour, put the remainder, with a small pinch of salt, into a clean saucepan, and when it boils quickly, stir the flour b...
-Chapter XIX. Souffles, Omelets, Etc
Observations On Omelets, Fritters, &C The composition and nature of a souffle are altogether different, but there is no difficulty in making good omelets, pancakes, or fritters, and as they may be ex...
-Souffles
The admirable lightness and delicacy of a well-made souffle render it generally a very favourite dish, and it is now a fashionable one also. It may be greatly varied in its composition, but in all cas...
-Pancakes
These may be made with the same batter as fritters, if it be sufficiently thinned with an additional egg or two, or a little milk or cream, to spread quickly over the pan: to fry them well, this ought...
-Fritters
Kentish Fritters Beat up the whites of three eggs and the yolks of six with half a pound of flour, a cupful of milk, and a large teaspoonful of yeast: put the mixture into a jug, cover it, and set it...
-Cannelons. (Entremets.)
Roll out very thin and evenly some fine puff-paste into a long strip of from three to four inches wide, moisten the surface with a feather dipped in white of egg, and cut it into bands of nearly two i...
-Rice Croquettes
Croquettes Of Rice. (Entremets.) Wipe very clean, in a dry cloth, seven ounces of rice, put it into a clean stewpan, and pour on it a quart of new milk; let it swell gently by the side of the fire, a...
-Rissoles. (Entree.)
This is the French name for small fried pastry of various forms, filled with meat or fish previously cooked; they may be made with brioche, or with light puff-paste, either of which must be rolled ext...
-Maccaroni
How To Boil Pipe Maccaroni We have found always the continental mode of dressing maccaroni the best. English cooks sometimes soak it in milk and, water for an hour or more, before it is boiled, that ...
-Forced Eggs
Forced Eggs For Salad Boil six fresh eggs for twelve minutes, and when they are perfectly cold, halve them lengthwise, take out the yolks, pound them to a paste with a third of their volume of fresh ...
-Chapter XX. Sweet Dishes, Or Entremets
Spinach Green, For Colouring Sweet Dishes, Confectionary, Or Soups Pound quite to a pulp, in a marble or wedgewood mortar, a handful or two of young freshly-gathered spinach, then throw it into a hai...
-How To Prepare Calf's Feet Stock
The feet are usually sent in from the butcher's ready to dress, but as a matter of economy or of convenience it is sometimes desirable to have them altogether prepared by the cook. Dip them in...
-How To Clarify Isinglass
The finely-cut purified isinglass, which is now in general use, requires no clarifying except for clear jellies: for all other dishes it is sufficient to dissolve, skim, and pass it through a muslin s...
-Prepared Apple, Or Quince Juice
Pour into a clean earthen pan two quarts of spring water, and throw into it as quickly as they can be pared, cored, and weighed, four pounds of nonsuches, pippins, or any other good boiling apples of ...
-Compotes
Compotes Of Fruit We would particularly invite the attention of the reader to these wholesome and agreeable preparations of fruit, which are much less served at English tables, generally, than they d...
-Stewed Fruit And Berries
Another Receipt For Stewed Peaches Should the fruit be not perfectly ripe, throw it into boiling water and keep it just simmering, until the skin can be easily stripped off. Have ready half a pound o...
-Gateaux
Gateau De Pommes Boil together for fifteen minutes a pound of well-refined sugar and half a pint of water; then add a couple of pounds of nonsuches, or of any other finely-flavoured apples which can ...
-Calf's Feet Jelly, (Entremets.)
We hear inexperienced housekeepers frequently complain of the difficulty of rendering this jelly perfectly transparent; but, by mixing with the other ingredients, while quite cold, the whites, and the...
-Calf's Feet Jelly. Part 2
Apple Calf's Feet Jelly Four a quart of prepared apple-juice (see page 305) on a pound of fresh apples pared and cored, and simmer them until they are well broken; strain the juice, and let it stand ...
-Isinglass Jellies
Orange Isinglass Jelly To render this perfectly transparent the juice of the fruit must be filtered, and the isinglass clarified; but it is not usual to take so much trouble for it. Strain as clear a...
-Jellies
Oranges Filled With Jelly This is one of the fanciful dishes which make a pretty appearance on a supper table, and are acceptable when much variety is desired. Take some very fine oranges, and with t...
-Queen Mab's Pudding
(an elegant summer disk.) Throw into a pint of new milk the thin rind of a small lemon, and six or eight bitter almonds, blanched and bruised; or substitute for these half a pod of vanilla, cut small,...
-Nesselrode Cream
Shell and blanch twenty-four fine Spanish chestnuts, and put them with three quarters of a pint of water into a small and delicately clean saucepan. When they have simmered from six to eight minutes, ...
-Ah Excellent Trifle
Take equal parts of wine and brandy, about a wineglassful of each, or two thirds of good sherry or Madeira, and one of spirit, and soak in the mixture four sponge-biscuits, and half a pound of macaroo...
-Creme Meringuee
Infuse in a pint of new milk the very thin rind of a lemon, with four or five bitter almonds bruised. As the quantity should not be reduced, it should be kept by the side of the fire until strongly ...
-Lemon Cream, Made Without Cream
Pour on the very thin rinds of two fresh lemons, and a pound of fine sugar broken small, or roughly powdered, one pint of boiling water, and let them remain an hour; then add the whites of six eggs an...
-Fruit Creams, And Italian Creams
These are very quickly and easily made, by mixing with good cream a sufficient proportion of the sweetened juice of fresh fruit, or of well-made fruit jelly or jam, to flavour it: a few drops of prepa...
-Very Superior Whipped Syllabubs
Weigh seven ounces of fine sugar and rasp on it the rinds of two fresh sound lemons of good size, then pound or roll it to powder, and put it into a bowl with the strained juice of the lemons, two lar...
-Blamanges
Good Common Blamange, Or Blanc Manger. (Author's Receipt.) Infuse for an hour in a pint and three quarters of new milk the very thin rind of one small, or of half a large lemon and eight bitter almon...
-Blamanges. Part 2
Quince Blamange. (Delicious.) This, if carefully made, and with ripe quinces, is one of the most richly-flavoured preparations of fruit that we have ever tasted; and the receipt, we may venture to sa...
-Blamanges. Part 3
Blamange Rubane, Or, Striped Blamange Make in the ordinary way, but a little firmer, one quart or two of blamange, according to the number of moulds that are to be filled; divide it into three or fou...
-An Apple Hedge-Hog, Or Suedoise
This dish is formed of apples, pared, cored without being divided, and stewed tolerably tender in a light syrup. These are placed in a dish, after being well drained, and filled with apricot, or any o...
-Imperial Gooseberry-Fool
Simmer a pound of green gooseberries which have been freed from the buds and stalks, in three-quarters of a pint of water, until they are well broken, then strain them, and to half a pound of the juic...
-Custards
Very Good Old-Fashioned Boiled Custard Throw into a pint and a half of new milk, the very thin rind of a fresh lemon, and let it infuse for half an hour, then simmer them together for a few minutes, ...
-Custards. Continued
Chocolate Custards Dissolve gently by the side of the fire an ounce and a half of the best chocolate in rather more than a wineglassful of water, and then boil it until it is perfectly smooth; mix wi...
-French Custards
To a quart of new milk allow the yolks of twelve fresh eggs, but to equal parts of milk and cream of ten only. From six to eight ounces of sugar will sweeten the custard sufficiently for general taste...
-Puffs
German Puffs Pound to a perfectly smooth paste two ounces of sweet almonds and six bitter ones; mix with them, by slow degrees, the yolks of six, and the whites of three eggs. Dissolve in half a pint...
-An Apple Charlotte, Or Charlotte Des Pommes
Butter a plain mould (a round or square cake-tin will answer the purpose quite well), and line it entirely with thin slices of the crumb of a stale loaf, cut so as to fit into it with great exactness,...
-Pommes Au Beurre
(buttered apples. Excellent.) Pare six or eight fine apples of a firm kind, but of a good cooking sort, and core without piercing them through, or dividing them; fill the cavities with fresh butter, p...
-Suedoise Of Peaches
Pare and divide four fine, ripe peaches, and let them just simmer from five to eight minutes in a syrup made with the third of a pint of water and three ounces of very white sugar, boiled together for...
-Aroce Doce (Or Sweet Rice. A La Portugaise)
Wipe thoroughly, in a dry soft cloth, half a pound of the best Carolina rice, after it has been carefully picked; put to it three pints of new milk, and when it has stewed gently for half an hour, add...
-Chapter XXI. Preserves
Introductory Remarks Fruit for preserving should always be gathered in perfectly dry weather; it should also be free both from the morning and evening dew, and as much so as possible from dust. When ...
-A Few General Rules And Directions For Preserving
1. Let every thing used for the purpose be delicately clean and dry; bottles especially so. 2. Never place a preserving-pan flat upon the fire, as this will render the preserve liable to burn to, as ...
-How To Preserve
How To Extract The Juice Of Plums For Jelly Take the stalks from the fruit, and throw aside all that is not perfectly sound; put it into very clean, large stone jars, and give part of the harder kind...
-How To Preserve Gooseberries
Green Gooseberry Jelly Wash some freshly-gathered gooseberries very clean, after having taken off the tops and stalks, then to each pound, pour three-quarters of a pint of spring water, and simmer th...
-How To Preserve Cherries
Cherry Jam First stone, and then weigh some freshly gathered preserving cherries; boil them over a brisk fire for an hour, keeping them almost constantly stirred from the bottom of the pan, to which ...
-How To Preserve Strawberries
Strawberry Jam Strip the stalks from some fine scarlet strawberries, weigh, and boil them for thirty-five minutes, keeping them very constantly stirred; throw in eight ounces of good sugar, beaten sm...
-How To Preserve Raspberries
Raspberry Jam Bruise gently, with the back of a wooden spoon, six pounds of ripe and freshly-gathered raspberries, and boil them over a brisk fire for twenty-five minutes; stir to them half their wei...
-How To Preserve Currants
Queen Currant Jam For each pound of currants take fourteen ounces of good sugar, in fine powder; bruise part of the fruit with a small portion of the sugar, und put it first into the preserving-pan, ...
-How To Preserve Currants. Continued
Delicious Red Currant Jam This, which is but an indifferent preserve when made in the usual way, will be found a very fine one if the following directions for it be observed; it will be extremely tra...
-How To Preserve Mogul Plum
Preserve of The Magnum Bonum, Or Mogul Plum Prepare, weigh, and boil the plums for forty minutes; stir to them half their weight of good sugar beaten fine, and when it is dissolved continue the boili...
-Mussel Plum Cheese And Jelly
Fill large stone jars with the fruit, which should be ripe, dry, and sound, set them into an oven from which the bread has been drawn several hours, and let them remain all night; or, if this cannot c...
-How To Preserve Apricots, Peaches Or Nectarines
How To Dry Apricots (a quick and easy method.) Wipe gently, split, and stone some fine apricots, which are not overripe; weigh, and arrange them evenly in a deep dish or bowl, and strew in fourteen o...
-How To Preserve Damson
Damson Jam. (Very Good.) The fruit for this jam should be freshly gathered and quite ripe. Split, stone, weigh, and boil it quickly for forty minutes; then stir in half its weight of good sugar rough...
-Grape Jelly
Strip from their stalks some fine ripe black-cluster grapes, and stir them with a wooden spoon over a gentle fire until all have burst, and the juice flows freely from them; strain it off without pres...
-How To Preserve English Guava
Strip the stalks from a gallon or two of the large kind of bullaces called the shepherd's bullace; give part of them a cut, put them into stone jars, and throw into one of them a pound or two of imper...
-How To Bottle Fruit For Winter Use
Gather the fruit in the middle of the day in very dry weather; strip off the stalks, and have in readiness some perfectly clean and dry wide-necked bottles; turn each of these the instant before it is...
-How To Make Apple Jelly
Various kinds of apples may be used successfully to make this jelly, but the nonsuch is by many persons preferred to all others for the purpose. The Ripstone pippin, however, may be used for it with v...
-How To Preserve Quince
Quince Jelly Pare, quarter, core, and weigh some ripe but quite sound quinces, as quickly as possible, and throw them as they are done into part of the water in which they are to be boiled, as direct...
-Jelly Of Siberian Crabs
This fruit makes a jelly of beautiful colour, and of pleasant flavour also; it may be stored in small moulds of ornamental shape, and turned out for a dessert dish. Take off the stalks, weigh, and was...
-How To Preserve Barberries
How To Preserve Barberries In Bunches Take the finest barberries, without stones, that can be procured, tie them together in bunches of four or five sprigs, and for each half pound of the fruit (whic...
-Orange Marmalade
Rasp very slightly on a fine and delicately clean grater the rinds of some sound Seville oranges; cut them in quarters, and separate the flesh from the rinds; then with the small end of a tea, or egg ...
-Genuine Scotch Marmalade
Take some bitter oranges, and double their weight of sugar; cut the rind of the fruit into quarters and peel it off, and if the marmalade be not wanted very thick, take off some of the spongy white s...
-Orange Conserve For Puddings
Wash and then soak in plenty of spring-water for three days, changing it night and morning, half a dozen Seville oranges; then boil them till they are sufficiently tender for the head of a pin to pier...
-Chapter XXII. Pickles
Observations On Pickles The first requisite in making pickles is to have unadulterated vinegar, for all the expense and trouble bestowed upon them is often entirely lost in consequence of ingredients...
-Pickles. Continued
How To Pickle Beet-Root Boil the beet-root tender by the directions of page 247, and when it is quite cold, pare and slice it; put it into a jar, and cover it with common vinegar previously boiled an...
-How To Pickle Lemons And Limes. (Excellent.)
Wipe eight fine sound lemons very clean, and make, at equal distances, four deep incisions in each, from the stalk to the blossom end, but without dividing the fruit; stuff them with as much salt as t...
-How To Pickle Barberries And Siberian Crabs
When wanted for garnishing only, take the fruit before it is very ripe, cut half the length of their stalks from the crabs, and free the barberries from the leaves, and from any discoloured berries th...
-How To Pickle Gherkins, Or Cucumbers
Let the gherkins be gathered on a dry day, before the frost has touched them; take off the blossoms, put them into a stone jar, and pour over them sufficient boiling brine to cover them well. The foll...
-How To Pickle Mushrooms
Select for this purpose, if they can be procured, the smallest buttons of the wild or meadow mushrooms, in preference to those which are artificially raised, and let them be as freshly gathered as pos...
-Mushrooms In Brine. (For Winter Use.) (Very Good.)
We have had small mushroom-buttons excellently preserved through the winter prepared as follows, and we therefore give the exact proportions which we had used for them, though the same quantity of bri...
-How To Pickle Peaches
Take, at their full growth, just before they begin to ripen, six large or eight moderate-sized peaches; wipe the down from them, and put them into brine that will float an egg. In three days let them ...
-Chapter XXIII. Cakes
General Remarks On Cakes The ingredients for cakes, as well as for puddings, should all be fresh and good, as well as free from damp; the lightness of many kinds depends entirely on that given to the...
-Cakes. Part 2
How To Whisk Eggs For Light Rich Cakes Break them one by one, and separate the yolks from the whites: this is done easily by pouring the yolk from one half of the shell to the other, and letting the ...
-Cakes. Part 3
A Galette The galette is a favourite cake in France, and may be made rich, and comparatively delicate, or quite common, by using more or less butter for it, and by augmenting or diminishing the size....
-Macaroons
Orange-Flower Macaroons. (Delicious.) Have ready two pounds of very dry white sifted sugar. Weigh two ounces of the petals of freshly-gathered orange-blossoms after they have been picked from the ste...
-Almond Cakes
How To Blanch Almonds Put them into a saucepan with plenty of cold water, and heat it slowly; when it is just scalding, turn the almonds into a basin, peel, and throw them into cold water as they are...
-Sponge Cakes
A Good Sponge Cake Rasp on some lumps of well-refined sugar the rind of a fine sound lemon, and scrape off the part which has imbibed the essence, or crush the plums to powder, and add them to as muc...
-A Good Madeira Cake
Whisk four fresh eggs until they are as light as possible, then, continuing still to whisk them, throw in by slow degrees the following ingredients in the order in which they are written: six ounces o...
-Banbury Cakes
First, mix well together a pound of currants, cleaned with great nicety and dried, a quarter-pound of beef-suet, finely minced, three ounces each of candied orange and lemon-rind, shred small, a few g...
-Meringues
Beat to a very solid froth the whites of six fresh eggs, and have ready to mix with them half a pound of the best sugar, well dried and sifted. Lay some squares or long strips of writing-paper closely...
-Gingerbread
Thick, Light Gingerbread Crumble down very small eight ounces of butter into a couple of pounds of flour, then add to, and mix thoroughly with them, half a pound of good brown sugar, two ounces of po...
-A Good Soda Cake
Rub half a pound of good butter into a pound of fine dry flour, and work it very small; mix well with these half a pound of sifted sugar, and pour to them first a quarter of a pint of boiling milk, an...
-Cinnamon, Or Lemon Cakes
Rub six ounces of good butter into a pound of fine dry flour, and work it lightly into crumbs, then add three quarters of a pound of sifted sugar, a dessertspoonful of pounded cinnamon (or half as muc...
-Biscuits
Cocoa-Nut Biscuit. (Excellent.) With a pound of flour mix three ounces of a sound fresh cocoa-nut, rasped on a fine grater; make a leaven as for the bun in the foregoing receipt, with a large tablesp...
-Chapter XXIV. Confectionary. How To Clarify Sugar
It is an economy to use at once the very best sugar for confectionary in general, for when highly refined it needs little or no clarifying, even for the most delicate purposes; and the coarser kinds l...
-How To Boil Sugar From Syrup To Candy, Or To Caramel
The technicalities by which confectioners distinguish the different degrees of sugar-boiling, seem to us calculated rather to puzzle than to assist the reader; and we shall, therefore, confine ourselv...
-Barley-Sugar
Add to three pounds of highly-refined sugar one pint and a quarter of spring water, with sufficient white of egg to clarify it in the manner directed in the last receipt but one: pour to it, when it b...
-Ginger Candy
Break a pound of highly-refined sugar into lumps, put it into a preserving--pan, and pour over it about the third of a pint of spring water; let it stand until the sugar is nearly dissolved, then set ...
-Flower Candy
Orange-Flower Candy Beat in three quarters of a pint, or rather more, of water, about the fourth part of the white of an egg; and pour it on two pounds of the best sugar broken into lumps. When it ha...
-Toffee
Everton Toffee Put into a brass skillet, if at hand, three ounces of very fresh butter, and as soon as it is just melted add a pound of brown sugar of moderate quality; keep these stirred gently over...
-Chapter XXV. Dessert Dishes
Melange Of Fruit Heap a dessert-dish quite high with alternate layers of fine fresh strawberries stripped from the stalks, white and red currants, and white or red raspberries; strew each layer plent...
-Dessert Dishes. Continued
Oranges Warmed Place them in a Dutch oven at a considerable distance from the fire, and keep them constantly turned: they should only be just warmed through. Fold them in a napkin when done, and send...
-Chapter XXVI. Syrups, Liqueurs, Etc
Mint Julep (An American Receipt.) Strip the tender leaves of mint into a tumbler, and add to them as much wine, brandy, or any other spirit, as you wish to take. Put some pounded ice into a second t...
-Excellent Barley Water
(Poor Xury's Receipt.) Wipe very clean, by rolling it in a soft cloth, two tablespoonsful of pearl barley; put it into a quart jug, with a lump or two of sugar, a grain or two of salt, and a strip of ...
-Strawberry Vinegar, Of Delicious Flavour
Take the stalks from the fruit, which should be of a highly flavoured sort, quite ripe, fresh from the beds, and gathered in dry weather; Weigh and put it into large glass jars, or wide-necked bottles...
-Very Fine Raspberry Vinegar
Fill glass jars, or large wide-necked bottles, with very ripe but perfectly sound, freshly gathered raspberries, freed from their stalks, and cover them with pale white wine vinegar: they may be left ...
-Oxford Punch
Extract the essence from the rinds of three lemons by rubbing them with sugar in lumps; put these into a large jug with the peel of two Seville oranges and of two lemons cut extremely thin, the juice ...
-A Birthday Syllabub
Put into a large howl half a pound of sugar broken small, and pour on it the strained juice of a couple of fresh lemons, stir these well together, and add to them a pint of port wine, a pint of sherry...
-Raisin Wine
(which, if long kept, really resembles foreign.) First boil the water which is to be used for the wine, and let it again become perfectly cold; then put into a sound sweet cask eight pounds of fine Ma...
-Excellent Elderberry Wine
Strip the berries, which should be fresh, and gathered on a dry day, clean from the stalks, and measure them into a tub or large earthen pan. Pour boiling water on them, in the proportion of two gallo...
-Very Good Ginger Wine
Boil together, for half an hour, fourteen quarts of water, twelve pounds of sugar, a quarter of a pound of the best ginger bruised, and the thin rinds of six large lemons. Put the whole, when milk-war...
-Excellent Orange Wine
Take half a chest of Seville oranges, pare off the rinds as thin as possible, put two thirds of them into six gallons of water, and let them remain for twenty-four hours. Squeeze the oranges (which ou...
-Currant Wine
Gather the currants when dry, extract the juice, either by mashing and pressing the fruit, or putting it in a jar, placed in boiling water; strain the juice, and for every gallon allow one gallon of w...
-Chapter XXVII. Coffee
How To Roast Coffee Persons who drink coffee habitually, and who are particular about its flavour and quality, should purchase the best kind in a raw state, and have it roasted at home. This can...
-How To Make Chocolate. (French Receipt.)
An ounce of chocolate, if good, will be sufficient for one person. Rasp, and then boil it from five to ten minutes with about four table-spoonsful of water; when it is extremely smooth add nearly a pi...
-How To Make Tea
Scald the teapot with boiling water; then put in the tea, allowing three teaspoonsful to a pint of water - or for every two persons. Pour on the water. It must be boiling hot, and let the tea steep ab...
-Chapter XXVIII. Bread
How To Purify Yeast For Bread Or Cakes The yeast procured from a public brewery is often so extremely bitter that it can only be rendered fit for use by frequent washings, and after these even it sho...
-How To Make Bread
Every cook, and we might almost say, every woman, ought to be perfectly acquainted with the mode of making good household bread; and skill in preparing other articles of food is poor compensation for ...
-Bordyke Bread
(Author's Receipt.) Mix with a gallon of flour a large teaspoonful of fine salt, make a hollow in the centre, and pour in two tablespoonsful of solid, well-purified yeast, gradually diluted with about...
-Dyspepsia Bread
This bread is now best known as Graham bread - not that Doctor Graham invented or discovered the manner of its preparation, but that he has been unwearied and successful in recommending it to the pu...
-Rye And Indian Bread
This is a sweet and nourishing diet, and generally acceptable to children. It is economical, and when wheat is scarce, is a pretty good substitute for dyspepsia bread. There are many different propo...
-Geneva Rolls
Break down very small three ounces of butter into a couple of pounds of flour; add a little salt, and set the sponge with a large tablespoonful of solid yeast, mixed with a pint of new milk, and a tab...
-Rusks
Break very small, six ounces of butter into a couple of pounds of fine dry flour, and mix them into a lithe paste, with two tablespoonsful of mild beer-yeast, three well-beaten eggs, and nearly half a...
-Muffins
Muffins are baked on a hot iron plate, and not in an oven. To 3 quarter of a peck of flour add three-quarters of a pint of yeast, four ounces of salt, and as much water (or milk) slightly warmed, as i...
-Cakes
Rice Cakes Boil half a pint of rice until quite soft, setting it aside until perfectly cool; beat three eggs very light and put them with a pint of wheat flour to the rice, making it into a batter wi...
-Yeast
It is impossible to have good light bread, unless you have lively, sweet yeast. When common family beer is well brewed and kept in a clean cask, the settlings are the best of yeast. If you do not keep...
-Chapter XXIX. American Mode Of Cooking Indian Corn
Maize or Indian corn has never been extensively used in Great Britain, and the editor has every reason to believe that this has arisen from the almost total ignorance of the English people as to the m...
-American Mode Of Cooking Pumpkin And Squash Pie
The usual way of dressing pumpkins in England in a pie is to cut them into slices, mixed with apples, and bake them with a top crust like ordinary pies. A quite different process is pursued in America...
-American Puddings
Carrot Pies These pies are made like pumpkin pies. The carrots should he boiled very tender, skinned, and sifted. American Custard Puddings Sufficiently good for common use, may be made by taking...
-Chapter XXX. Directions For Carving
Garnishing, And Setting Out A Table In preparing meat for the table, and in laying out the table, refer ence ought to be had to the carving department - a very onerous one to all, and to many a very ...
-How To Carve Fish
As fish is the first thing to be carved, or served, we shall first speak of it. In helping fish, take care not to break the flakes, which in cod and fine fresh salmon, and some other sorts, are large....
-How To Carve Beef
Aitch Bone Of Beef Cut a slice an inch thick all through. Put this by, and serve in slices from the remainder. Some persons, however, like outside, and others take off a thinner slice before serving,...
-How To Carve Veal
Fillet Of Veal Is the corresponding part to the round in an ox, and is cut in the same way. If the outside brown be not desired, serve the next slice. Cut deep into the stuffing, and help a thin slic...
-How To Carve Mutton
Calf's Head Affords a great variety of excellent meat, differing in texture and flavour, and therefore requires a judicious and skilful carver properly to divide it. Cut slices longways under the eye...
-How To Carve Pork and Ham
Ham The most economical way of cutting a ham, which is seldom or never eaten at one meal, is to begin to cut at the knuckle end, and proceed onwards. The usual way, however, is to begin at the middle...
-How To Carve Fowls
A Fowl The legs of a boiled fowl are always bent inwards, and tucked into the belly, but before it is put upon the table, the skewers by which they are secured ought to be removed. The fowl should be...
-How To Carve Poultry
A Pheasant Take out the skewers; fix your fork in the centre of the breast, slice it down; remove the leg by cutting in the sideway direction, then take off the wing, taking care to miss the neck-bon...
-How To Carve Hares and Rabbits
Hare Put the point of the knife under the shoulder, and cut all the way down to the rump, on the side of the back-bone. By doing the same on the other side, the hare will be divided into three parts....
-Garnishes
Parsley is the most universal garnish to all kinds of cold meat, poultry, fish, butter, cheese, and so forth. Horse-radish is the garnish for roast beef, and for fish in general; for the latter, slice...
-Setting Out A Table
A prudent housekeeper, in providing for a family, or for company, will endeavonr to secure variety, and avoid extravagance, taking care not to have two dishes alike, or nearly alike, such as ducks and...
-Appendix. Relative Duties Of Mistress And Maid
Cooking is neither a mean, nor a simple art. To make the best and the most of everything connected with the sustenance of a family, requires not only industry and experience, but also considerable men...
-What Must Always Be Done, And What Must Never Be Done
1. Keep yourself clean and tidy; let your hands, in particular, be always clean whenever it is practicable. After a dirty job, always wash them. A cleanly cook must wash her hands many times in the co...









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