Washington, the name of 28 counties in the United States.

I. The Extreme S. E, County Of Maine

County Of Maine The Extreme S. E, separated from New Brunswick by the St. Croix river, bounded S. by the Atlantic ocean, and drained by the Schoodic and Machias rivers; area, about 2,700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 43,343. The surface is undulating and the soil in the interior fertile. There are numerous lakes, the principal of which are the Schoodic, Big, Bascahegan, and Grand. The coast line is nearly 80 m. long, indented with numerous bays and inlets, which afford excellent harbors. Passamaquoddy bay is on the S. E. border. The county is traversed by the European and North American, the St. Croix and Penobscot, and the Whitneyville and Machiasport railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 2,029 bushels of wheat, 35,997 of oats, 12,427 of barley, 11,102 of buckwheat, 237,102 of potatoes, 526,913 lbs. of butter, 47,072 of wool, and 30,120 tons of hay. There were 2,139 horses, 15,341 milch cows, 6,148 other cattle, 15,211 sheep, and 1,431 swine. There were 327 manufactories; capital invested, $2,277,920; value of products, $4,273,067. The chief establishments were 10 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 9 of cooperage, 22 of cured fish, 5 of iron, 3 of machinery, 1 of ground plaster, 6 of sails, 24 ship yards, 63 saw mills, 4 tanneries, and 4 flour mills.

Capital, Machias.

II. A N. Central County Of Vermont

A N. Central County Of Vermont, drained by Onion river and its tributaries; area, 580 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 26,520. The surface is very much broken, and in some parts mountainous. Most of the county lies between the E. and W. ranges of the Green mountains. It is intersected by the Vermont Central railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 3,730 bushels of wheat, 127,480 of Indian corn, 395,424 of oats, 30,988 of buckwheat, 393,841 of potatoes, 2,218,224 lbs. of butter, 92,547 of cheese, 121,195 of wool, 1,109,678 of maple sugar, and 83,961 tons of hay. There were 5,564 horses, 17,154 milch cows, 12,359 other cattle, 26,169 sheep, and 3,428 swine; 3 manufactories of agricultural implements, 3 of boots and shoes, 14 of carriages and wagons, 3 of iron castings, 6 of machinery, 12 of saddlery and harness, 2 of washing machines, etc, 5 of woollens, 29 saw mills, 6 tanneries, 3 currying establishments, and 2 flour mills. Capital, Montpelier, which is also the capital of the state.

III. A S. County Of Rhode Island

A S. County Of Rhode Island, bordering on Connecticut, bounded E. by Narragansett bay and S. by the Atlantic ocean, and drained by Charles river and its tributaries; area, 367 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 20,097; in 1875, 20,061. The surface is uneven and the soil fertile and well adapted to pasturage. It is intersected by the Stonington and Providence railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 2,087 bushels of wheat, 88,640 of Indian corn, 53,755 of oats, 118,017 of potatoes, 248,354 lbs. of butter, 21,242 of cheese, 29,183 of wool, and 20,425 tons of hay. There were 1,541 horses, 4,047 milch cows, 4,465 other cattle, 9,359 sheep, and 2,731 swine. There were 121 manufacturing establishments; capital invested, $3,120,580; value of products, $6,083,320. The principal establishments were 7 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 1 of iron castings, 3 of marble and stone work, 1 of drugs and chemicals, 1 of engines and boilers, 26 of cotton goods, 33 of woollen goods, and 5 saw mills. Capital, Kingston.

IV. An E. County Of New York

An E. County Of New York, bordering on Vermont, from which it is in part separated by Lake Champlain, and bounded W. partly by the Hudson river and Lake George; area, 850 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 49,568; in 1875, 48,167. The surface is mountainous in the north and moderately hilly in the south, and the soil in some parts is fertile. Iron ore, slate, marble, water limestone, marl, lead, and copper are found. It is traversed by the Champlain canal and the Rensselaer and Saratoga railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 24,091 bushels of wheat, 105,932 of rye, 384,702 of Indian corn, 761,489 of oats, 58,479 of buckwheat, 2,141,464 of potatoes, 1,606,457 lbs. of butter, 225,002 of cheese, 507,183 of wool, 1,285,033 of flax, and 118,257 tons of hay. There were 10,222 horses, 18,352 milch cows, 14,144 other cattle, 102,045 sheep, and 9,301 swine. There were 427 manufactories; capital invested, $3,561,980; value of products, $5,028,391. The chief establishments were 4 manufactories of agricultural implements, 35 of carriages and wagons, 6 of cheese, 7 of dressed flax, 1 of gunpowder, 1 of hosiery, 1 of pig iron, 6 of iron castings, 6 of lime, 7 of machinery, 5 of marble and stone work, 8 of paper, 2 of stone and earthen ware, 8 of woollen goods, 6 planing mills, 22 saw mills, 11 tanneries, 9 currying establishments, and 11 flour mills.

Capitals, Salem and Sandy Hill.

V. A S. W. County Of Pennsylvania

A S. W. County Of Pennsylvania, bounded W. by West Virginia and E. by the Monongahela river, and traversed by several railroads; area, 888 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 48,483. It has a hilly surface, and a rich limestone soil in the hilly portions, and a deep black loam in the bottoms. Great attention has been paid to wool growing, and the sheep of this county are of the best quality. Bituminous coal and limestone are very abundant, and iron ore is found. The chief productions in 1870 were 451,828 bushels of wheat, 27,243 of rye, 1,467,904 of Indian corn, 1,062,408 of oats, 128,367 of barley, 187,516 of potatoes, 1,178,306 lbs. of butter, 1,862,752 of wool, and 67,595 tons of hay. There were 12,421 horses, 12,280 milch cows, 16,604 other cattle, 482,708 sheep, and 26,274 swine; 26 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 11 of furniture, 1 of printing paper, 6 of boats, 18 of saddlery and harnesses, 6 of woollens, 6 planing mills, 12 saw mills, 10 distilleries, 8 tanneries, and 11 flour mills. Capital, Washington.

VI. A N. W. County Of Maryland

A N. W. County Of Maryland, bordering on Pennsylvania, separated from Virginia by the Potomac, and intersected by Antietam, Conecocheague, and Licking creeks; area, 818 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 34,712, of whom 2,838 were colored. The surface is very hilly, and the South mountain, a continuation of the Blue Ridge, extends along the E. border. Iron ore, bituminous coal, and limestone are found. It is traversed by the Chesapeake and Ohio canal, and by the Cumberland Valley and Western Maryland railroads and the Washington County division of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 930,246 bushels of wheat, 28,394 of rye, 737,989 of Indian corn, 142,886 of oats, 90,885 of potatoes, 393,070 lbs. of butter, 48,284 of wool, and 29,281 tons of hay. There were 8,423 horses, 6,310 milch cows, 10,023 other cattle, 9,268 sheep, and 20,212 swine; 5 manufactories of agricultural implements, 11 of carriages and wagons, 1 of cement, 15 of furniture, 2 of pig iron, 4 of iron castings, 1 of printing paper, 16 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 6 saw mills, 3 distilleries, 10 tanneries, 8 currying establishments, and 41 flour mills.

Capital, Hagerstown.

VII. A S. W. County Of Virginia

A S. W. County Of Virginia, bordering on Tennessee, and intersected by the North and South forks of Holston river; area, 520 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 16,816, of whom 2,653 were colored. It is traversed by the Iron mountain in the S. E., and Clinch mountain forms the N. W. boundary. The surface is mountainous or hilly, and the soil generally fertile. Iron, bituminous coal, gypsum, and limestone are abundant, and there are valuable salt wells, yielding large quantities for exportation. The Atlantic, Mississippi, and Ohio railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 106,521 bushels of wheat, 10,863 of rye, 351,732 of Indian corn, 183,147 of oats, 11,383 of potatoes, 187,010 lbs. of butter, 28,936 of wool, 27,864 of tobacco, and 5,008 tons of hay. There were 4,292 horses, 4,404 milch cows, 6,012 other cattle, 13,308 sheep, and 14,733 swine; 13 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 13 of furniture, 2 of ground plaster, 7 wool-carding and cloth-dressing establishments, 2 pork-packing establishments, 11 tanneries, and 9 sawmills.

Capital, Abingdon.

VIII. An E. County Of North Carolina

An E. County Of North Carolina, bordering on Albemarle sound; area, 360 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 6,516, of whom 2,777 were colored. The surface is level and mostly covered with swamps, which abound in valuable cypress and red cedar timber. Pongo and Scuppernong lakes are on the S. E. border. The chief productions in 1870 were 2,413 bushels of wheat, 152,038 of Indian corn, 28,309 of sweet potatoes, 13,256 lbs. of rice, and 1,087 bales of cotton. There were 483 horses, 941 milch cows, 1,880 other cattle, 1,606 sheep, and 6,213 swine. Capital, Plymouth.

IX. An E. County Of Georgia

An E. County Of Georgia, bounded S. W. by the Oconee river, and N. E. partly by the Ogeechee; area, 760 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 15,842, of whom 8,312 were colored. It has a diversified surface and a fertile soil. Limestone and buhrstone abound. Near the county seat are several extensive caves in which have been found a great variety of fossils, the remains of mammoth animals, while opal, jasper, agate, and chalcedony have been found in the vicinity. It is intersected by the Georgia Central railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 11,557 bushels of wheat, 15,822 of rye, 313,487 of Indian corn, 43,590 of sweet potatoes, 36,152 lbs. of butter, 8,024 of wool, and 11,338 bales of cotton. There were 1,485 horses, 1,427 mules and asses, 2,704 milch cows, 6,923 other cattle, 4,557 sheep, and 21,633 swine. Capital, Sandersville.

X. A W. County Of Florida

A W. County Of Florida, bordering on the gulf of Mexico, and bounded N. and W. by Choctawhatchee bay and river; area, 1,100 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 2,302, of whom 373 were colored. St. Andrew's bay on the S. border forms an excellent harbor. The surface is undulating, and the soil fertile in the interior and poor on the coast. Live oak is abundant, and forms an important article of export. The chief productions in 1870 were 34,900 bushels of Indian corn, 13,061 of sweet potatoes, 7,590 lbs. of tobacco, and 107 bales of cotton. There were 145 horses, 1,321 milch cows, 3,977 other cattle, 799 sheep, and 4,087 swine. Capital, Vernon.

XI. A S. W. County Of Alabama

A S. W. County Of Alabama, bordering on Mississippi and bounded E. by the Tombigbee river; area, 940 sq, m.; pop. in 1870, 3,912, of whom 1,787 were colored. The surface is uneven and the soil sandy and moderately fertile. The Mobile and Ohio railroad crosses the S. W. part. The chief productions in 1870 were 57,034 bushels of Indian corn, 14,260 of sweet potatoes, 5,103 lbs. of wool, 4,500 of rice, and 1,803 bales of cotton. There were 403 horses, 2,626 milch cows, 4,750 other cattle, 2,389 sheep, and 5,024 swine. Capital, Saint Stephens.

XII. A W. County Of Mississippi

A W. County Of Mississippi, separated from Arkansas by the Mississippi river, bounded E. partly by the Yazoo, and intersected by the Sunflower, Steele bayou, and Deer creek; area, 1,220 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 14,569, of whom 12,405 were colored. The surface is level, liable to inundations, and interspersed with small lakes and ponds, and the soil is highly fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 2,700 bushels of wheat, 248,991 of Indian corn, 105,325 of oats, 5,132 of sweet potatoes, and 35,902 bales of cotton. There were 1,240 horses, 3,716 mules and asses, 2,101 milch cows, 6,295 other cattle, 1,089 sheep, and 9,175 swine. Capital, Greenville.

XIII. A S. E. Parish Of Louisiana

A S. E. Parish Of Louisiana, bounded N. and E. by Mississippi, from which it is separated by Pearl river, and intersected by Bogue Chitto creek; area, about 700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,330, of whom 939 were colored; in 1875, 3,769, of whom 983 were colored. The surface is generally undulating, and the soil sandy and moderately fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 33,729 bushels of Indian corn, 14,903 of sweet potatoes, 12,807 lbs. of rice, 5,173 of wool, and 533 bales of cotton. There were 618 horses, 1,448 milch cows, 2,678 other cattle, 2,732 sheep, and 5,772 swine. Capital, Franklinton.

XIV. A S. E. County Of Texas

A S. E. County Of Texas, bounded N. by Yegua creek, and E. by the Brazos river; area, 726 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 23,104, of whom 12,241 were colored. The surface is undulating and the soil generally a deep and fertile loam. Live oak and red cedar are abundant. The Houston and Texas Central railroad traverses it. The chief productions in 1870 were 663,252 bushels of Indian corn, 11,814 of Irish and 59,192 of sweet potatoes, 157,237 lbs. of butter, 12,044 of wool, 22,452 bales of cotton, and 1,023 tons of hay. There were 7,313 horses, 2,182 mules and asses, 10,944 milch cows, 33,788 other cattle, 8,264 sheep, and 23,150 swine. Capital, Brenham.

XV. A N. W. County Of Arkansas

A N. W. County Of Arkansas, bordering on the Indian territory, and drained by the head streams of White and Illinois rivers; area, 870 sq. m.; pop. in 1870,17,266, of whom 674 were colored. The surface is diversified, and the soil fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 156,621 bushels of wheat, 580,687 of Indian corn, 71,938 of oats, 40,229 of Irish and 18,562 of sweet potatoes, 156,648 lbs. of butter, 14,876 of wool, and 116,176 of tobacco. There were 4,667 horses, 1,130 mules and asses, 4,153 milch cows, 5,912 other cattle, 7,597 sheep, and 33,431 swine. Capital, Fayetteville.

XVI. A N. E. County Of Tennessee

A N. E. County Of Tennessee, bounded N. E. by the Watauga river, intersected by the Nolichucky, and separated from North Carolina by Bald mountain; area, about 430 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 16,317, of whom 1,614 were colored. The surface is diversified by mountains and valleys, and the soil of the latter is highly fertile. Iron ore is abundant, and bituminous coal is found. It is traversed by the East Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 170,934 bushels of wheat, 290,388 of Indian corn, 148,383 of oats, 8,488 of Irish and 3,656 of sweet potatoes, 167,677 lbs. of butter, 2,694 of wool, 22,806 of tobacco, and 5,669 tons of hay. There were 3,620 horses, 3,604 milch cows, 5,310 other cattle, 13,208 sheep, and 15,335 swine; 1 pig iron establishment, 19 flour mills, and 3 saw mills. Capital, Jonesborough.

XVII. A Central County Of Kentucky

A Central County Of Kentucky, bounded N. W. by Lick creek; area, about 550 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,464, of whom 2,110 were colored. It has an undulating surface and a fertile soil resting on a limestone formation. The chief productions in 1870 were 115,901 bushels of wheat, 40,437 of rye, 643,588 of Indian corn, 84,742 of oats, 22,405 of potatoes, 150,997 lbs. of butter, 31,944 of wool, 34,975 of tobacco, and 2,201 tons of hay. There were 5,087 horses, 1,816 mules and asses, 3,108 milch cows, 5,968 other cattle, 10,635 sheep, and 27,733 swine; 2 flour mills, and 5 saw mills. Capital, Springfield.

XVIII. A S. E. County Of Ohio

A S. E. County Of Ohio, separated from West Virginia by the Ohio river, and intersected by the Muskingum; area, 713 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 40,609. It has a diversified surface and a very fertile soil. Iron ore is found, and bituminous coal is very abundant. It is traversed by the Marietta and Cincinnati and Marietta and Pittsburgh railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 206,549 bushels of wheat, 675,616 of Indian corn, 245,414 of oats, 216,297 of potatoes, 702,606 lbs. of butter, 236,230 of wool, 1,041,125 of tobacco, and 26,431 tons of hay. There were 7,047 horses, 7,669 milch cows, 11,176 other cattle, 61,764 sheep, and 17,533 swine; 4 manufactories of boots and shoes, 5 of furniture, 1 of hubs and wagon material, 1 of rectified coal oil, 32 of cooperage, 4 of iron, 4 of woollens, 1 planing mill, 8 saw mills, 6 tanneries, 6 currying establishments, and 10 flour mills. Capital, Marietta.

XIX. A S. County Of Indiana

A S. County Of Indiana, bounded N. by the Muscatatock river, and drained by the Lost and Great Blue; area, 510 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 18,495. The "Knobs" range of hills are in the E. part. The surface is mostly undulating, and the soil very fertile, resting upon a limestone and sandstone formation. Lost river flows for a considerable distance under ground. The Louisville, New Albany, and Chicago railroad passes through the county. The chief productions in 1870 were 213,378 bushels of wheat, 681,399 of Indian corn, 252,229 of oats, 33,803 of potatoes, 320,309 lbs. of butter, 48,386 of wool, 30,230 of tobacco, and 8,546 tons of hay. There were 6,378 horses, 1,125 mules and asses, 5,235 milch cows, 8,766 other cattle, 18,290 sheep, and 29,176 swine; 4 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 8 of furniture, 11 tanneries, 7 currying establishments, 11 saw mills, 15 flour mills, and 1 woollen mill. Capital, Salem.

XX. A S. W. County Of Illinois

A S. W. County Of Illinois, drained by the Kaskaskia river and Elkhorn, Beaucoup, and Muddy creeks; area, 580 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 17,599. The surface is level and finely diversified with prairie and woodland, and the soil is in parts very fertile. It is traversed by the Illinois Central and the St. Louis and Southeastern railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 672,486 bushels of wheat, 836,115 of Indian corn, 533,398 of oats, 64,592 of potatoes, 251,529 lbs. of butter, 22,136 of wool, and 12,491 tons of hay. There were 6,220 horses, 1,333 mules and asses, 3,798 milch cows, 4,812 other cattle, 8,037 sheep, and 20,563 swine; 6 manufactories of agricultural implements, 13 of carriages and wagons, 14 flour mills, 1 woollen mill, and 3 saw mills. Capital, Nashville.

XXI. A S. E. County Of Wisconsin

A S. E. County Of Wisconsin, drained by the Milwaukee river and other streams; area, 432 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 23,919; in 1875, 23,862. There are two or three small lakes. The surface is mostly level, and the soil, very fertile. Excellent limestone for building abounds, andiron is found in some parts. The Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 716,687 bushels of wheat, 75,767 of rye, 216,382 of Indian corn, 393,543 of oats, 64,303 of barley, 192,995 of potatoes, 632,214 lbs. of butter, 57,456 of wool, and 23,025 tons of hay. There were 6,700 horses, 8,459 milch cows, 7,813 other cattle, 16,808 sheep, and 12,773 swine; 1 manufactory of agricultural implements, 18 of carriages and wagons, 6 of furniture, 13 of saddlery and harness, 9 flour mills, and 12 saw mills. Capital, West Bend.

XXII. An E. County Of Minnesota

An E. County Of Minnesota, separated from Wisconsin by the St. Croix river, and bounded S. by the Mississippi; area, 380 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 11,809; in 1875, 14,751. It has a diversified surface and a fertile soil. There are numerous small lakes. It is traversed by the Lake Superior and Mississippi, the North Wisconsin, and the West Wisconsin railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 444,411 bushels of wheat, 113,650 of Indian corn, 267,086 of oats, 42,155 of barley, 45,686 of potatoes, 118,392 lbs. of butter, 6,806 of wool, and 6,430 tons of hay. There were 1,699 horses, 2,074 milch cows, 2,090 other cattle, 2,179 sheep, and 2,870 swine; 4 manufactories of cooperage, 4 breweries, 4 flour mills, and 11 saw mills. Capital, Stillwater.

XXIII. A S. E. County Of Iowa, Drained By The Iowa

Skunk Drained By The Iowa A S. E. County Of Iowa, and English rivers; area, 556 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 18,952. It has a level surface, diversified by prairie and woodland, and the soil is generally very fertile. It is partly traversed by the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 333,053 bushels of wheat, 1,028,564 of Indian corn, 268,027 of oats, 67,167 of potatoes, 457,010 lbs. of butter, 20,879 of cheese, 66,864 of wool, and 31,246 tons of hay. There were 8,653 horses, 7,165 milch cows, 14,518 other cattle, 19,618 sheep, and 30,886 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 4 of furniture, 2 of iron castings, 7 flour mills, 4 saw mills, and 3 woollen mills. Capital, Washington.

XXIV. An E. County Of Nebraska

An E. County Of Nebraska, separated from Iowa by the Missouri river, and bounded S. W. by the Elkhorn; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,452; in 1875, 6,114. The surface is undulating and the soil fertile. Timber is found along the streams. The Omaha and North western and the Sioux City and Pacific railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 164,611 bushels of wheat, 203,695 of Indian corn, 108,971 of oats, 40,617 of potatoes, 4,758 lbs. of wool, 97,032 of butter, and 8,078 tons of hay. There were 1,431 horses, 1,289 milch cows, 2,107 other cattle, 1,478 sheep, and 2,508 swine; 3 flour mills, and 3 saw mills. Capital, Blair.

XXV. A S. E. County Of Missouri

A S. E. County Of Missouri, bounded N. E. partly by Big river and N. W. partly by the Maramec; area, 870 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 11,719, of whom 971 were colored. The surface is generally very hilly, and the soil moderately fertile. The county is celebrated for its mineral wealth. Iron mountain near the S. E. border is a huge mass of magnetic iron ore, and lead mines are very numerous near the county seat. Silver, copper, plumbago, copperas, chalk, and limestone are also found in considerable quantities. The county is intersected by the St. Louis and Iron Mountain railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 38,627 bushels of wheat, 261,633 of Indian corn, 86,809 of oats, 20,398 of potatoes, 69,709 lbs. of butter, 14,684 of wool, and 2,378 tons of hay. There were 2,573 horses, 2,626 milch cows, 4,447 other cattle, 7,830 sheep, and 16,036 swine; 7 flour mills, 13 saw mills, 1 blast furnace, and 15 lead furnaces. Capital, Potosi.

XXVI. A N. E. County Of Kansas

A N. E. County Of Kansas, bordering on Nebraska, and watered by the Little Blue river and other streams; area, 900 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,081; in 1875, 8,622. The surface is rolling, and consists of prairies, with well timbered river bottoms; the soil is moderately fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 51,176 bushels of wheat, 123,124 of Indian corn, 18,484 of oats, 16,109 of potatoes, 53,182 lbs. of butter, and 5,284 tons of hay. There were 735 horses, 837 milch cows, 1,562 other cattle, 452 sheep, and 761 swine. Capital, Washington.

XXVII. A N. W. County Of Oregon

A N. W. County Of Oregon, bounded E. by the Willamette river, bordering W. on the Coast mountains, and watered by Tualatin river, which is navigable for some distance, and other streams; area, 750 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,261; in 1875, 4,963. The surface is diversified with prairies and groves of timber, and the soil is fertile. Iron ore is abundant. It is traversed by the Oregon Central railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 157,187 bushels of wheat, 183,151 of oats, 4,724 of barley, 28,915 of potatoes, 29,920 lbs. of wool, 72,118 of butter, and 5,409 tons of hay. There were 1,718 horses, 1,503 milch cows, 1,880 other cattle, 6,135 sheep, and 6,177 swine. Capital, Hillsborough.

XXVIII. The S. W. County Of Utah

XXVIII. The S. W. County Of Utah, bordering on Arizona and Nevada, and watered by the Rio Virgin and Santa Clara rivers; area, 1,890 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,064. The Wahsatch mountains are on the north. There is considerable productive soil in the valleys of the streams. Cotton has been produced. The chief product tions in 1870 were 4,842 bushels of wheat, 5,769 of Indian corn, 10,209 of potatoes, and 5,345 lbs. of wool. There were 739 horses, 1,193 milch cows, 2,007 other cattle,.3,170 sheep, and 152 swine; 4 saw mills, and 1 quartz mill. Capital, St. George.