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The New Home Cook Book | by Ladies Of Chicago Et Al



In issuing this sixtieth thousand new edition of The New Home Cook Book, renewed pleasure is taken in acknowledging the favor with which the work has been received. This edition is enriched by the new, expressly prepared articles: "The Fireless Cooker," "The Casserole," and "Sunday Night Suppers," being complementary to "Housekeeping in the Twentieth Century," "Home Making and House Furnishing," and "Oil and Gas Stove Cooking". In its chief and distinctive character as a collection of choice and valuable recipes, tried and approved by well known and experienced housekeepers, the work is unchanged.

TitleThe New Home Cook Book
AuthorLadies Of Chicago Et Al
PublisherA. C. McClurg & Co.
Year1911
Copyright1911 By J. Fred Waggoner
AmazonThe Home Cook Book: Tried, Tested, Proved

cover

The New Home Cook Book

Compiled from Recipes contributed by Ladies of Chicago and other Cities and Towns

Originally published for the Benefit of the Home for the Friendless, Chicago

With New, Additional Matter

With dispatchful looks, in haste
She turns, on hospitable thoughts intent.
What choice to choose for delicacy best,
What order, so contrived as not to mix
Tastes not well joined, inelegant, but bring
Taste after taste upheld with kindliest change.

- Paradise Lost.

-Foreword
In issuing this sixtieth thousand new edition of The New Home Cook Book, renewed pleasure is taken in acknowledging the favor with which the work has been received. This edition is enriched by the new...
-Housekeeping in the Twentieth Century
The next generation will doubtless see even greater progress in the arts and sciences than has been made in these latter years of the nineteenth century. Will there be a similar advance in the applian...
-Home Making And House Furnishing
The entrance to a house, the first impression it gives, may indicate the nature of its occupants; indeed, one's habitat of necessity takes on a certain air of personality. This is less a question of o...
-The Entrance Hall
Entering a house from the bright sunlight the eye tolerates an excess of color and light. For this reason the carpets and fittings may be as rich as the circumstances of the occupants will permit. Gil...
-Carpets And Rugs
The choice of carpeting for halls and rooms should be decided by fitness and cost. The prevailing tendency is to dark, rich colors for halls, stairways, and well-lighted south rooms; light colors are ...
-Doors And Portieres
In a private house, or an apartment occupied only by one family, there is but little occasion for doors for the purpose of seclusion, except in sleeping-rooms. And, so far as that is concerned, doors ...
-The Parlor And Living Rooms
Unless the establishment is grand enough to afford a room of state reception for special and formal entertainments, an actual drawing-room, the parlor should be what its name indicates, and what it wa...
-Dining-Room, Kitchen, Etc.
In the dining-room the carpets and draperies should be only those which are essential for comfort. As already indicated, woollen should be avoided as far as possible, because of its tendency to absorb...
-Bedrooms And Nursery
The upper portion of the house remains to be considered. The remarks concerning one sleeping-room will apply to all unless there are many and the desire is to furnish them differently: taste will then...
-Household Ornaments
But little has been said about pictures and ornaments in any room, because their selection depends entirely upon the owner's taste as regulated by the amount available for such indulgences. As for art...
-Oil And Gas Stove Cooking
When one becomes accustomed to a particular machine, implement, or utensil, and grows familiar with the methods of operating or handling it, one is apt to fancy that particular kind the best that has ...
-Table Talk
In all attempts at refinement, one cardinal point should be kept in view that manners were made for men, not men for manners. Most rules will be found to serve convenience, and there is no goo...
-Dinner Etiquette
Directions for a ceremonious dinner naturally include those for the family table, as much form in serving being kept as may be convenient. The number of guests for a state dinner, even such as are ...
-Marketing
Every lady, whatever her position in life, ought to understand how to select and purchase such stores as are needed in her family. Possibly she may never be called upon to put this knowledge into prac...
-Servants
There is, in this country, a foolish prejudice against the term Servant. Why? What is the true meaning of the word? A slave? No. An inferior? Not necessarily. The definiton is very simple : One wh...
-A Few Things About "Servants."
The best way to select, and the surest way to secure, honest and faithful servants, is a matter which has always perplexed housekeepers, and seems to be a growing trouble. It must be remembered, howev...
-The Kitchen
Few things tend so much to peace and comfort, making all laboring for the family contented and comfortable, as a bright, pleasant, well furnished kitchen. In no other room in the house are sunlight an...
-Utensils Necessary In The Kitchen Of A Small Family
Wooden Ware Kitchen Table; Wash Bench; Wash Tubs, (three sizes); Wash Board; Skirt Board; Bosom Board; Bread Board; Towel Roll; Potatoe Masher; Wooden Spoons; Clothes Stick; Flour Barrel Cover; Flo...
-Soups
No useless dish our table crowds ; Harmoniously ranged and consonantly just, As in a concert instruments resound, Our ordered dishes in their courses chime. The basis of all good soups, is the br...
-Soups. Part 2
Mutton Soup Mrs. Whitehead. Boil a leg of mutton three hours; season to your taste with salt and pepper, and add one teaspoon of summer savory; make a batter of one egg, two tablespoons of milk, tw...
-Soups. Part 3
Lobster Soup Mrs. Robert Harris. One large lobster or two small ones; pick all the meat from the shell and chop fine ; scald one quart of milk and one pint of water; then add the lobster, one pound...
-Soups. Part 4
Mock Turtle Soup Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. One soup-bone, one quart of turtle beans, one large spoonful of powdered cloves, salt and pepper. Soak the beans over night, put them on with the soup-bone i...
-Soups. Part 5
Tomato Soup Mrs. L. H. Smith. Make one gallon beef stock. Take half peck ripe tomatoes, cut in halves, two carrots, two onions, one turnip cut fine; boil all together for one hour and a half, th...
-Soups. Part 6
Turtle Bean Soup Mrs. A. N. Arnold. Take a quart of black beans, wash them and put them in a pot with three quarts of water; boil until thoroughly soft; rub the pulp through a colander and retur...
-Soups. Part 7
Egg Balls For Soup M. A. T. Boil four eggs; put into cold water; mash yolks with yolk of one raw egg, and one teaspoon of flour; pepper, salt and parsley; make into balls and boil two minutes. ...
-Fish
The silvery fish, Grazing at large in meadows submarine, Fresh from the wave now cheers Our festive board. Anon. Fish are good, when the gills are red, eyes are full, and the body of ...
-Fish. Part 2
Turbot A La Creme Mrs. A. Keith. Boil a large white fish; pick it up fine, taking out the bones; make a sauce of a quart of milk, a little thyme, a few sprigs of parsley, a little onion; simmer ...
-Fish. Part 3
Broiled White Fish - Fresh Mrs. G. E. P. Wash and drain the fish; sprinkle with pepper and lay with the inside down upon the gridiron, and broil over fresh bright coals. When a nice brown, turn ...
-Shell Fish
Oysters On The Shell Wash the shells and put them on hot coals or upon the top of a hot stove, or bake them in a hot oven; open the shells with an oyster knife, taking care to lose none of the liqu...
-Shell Fish. Part 2
Escaloped Oysters Mrs. D. Crush and roll several handfuls of friable crackers; put a layer in the bottom of a buttered pudding dish; wet this with a mixture of the oyster liquor and milk, slight...
-Shell Fish. Part 3
To Fry Oysters Mrs. Edward Ely. Roll a few crackers; beat two eggs ; wash your oysters or not, according to your notion, but the bits of shell must be removed; dip your oysters into the egg, the...
-Shell Fish. Part 4
Lobster Chowder Mrs. Lamkin. Four or five pounds of lobster, chopped fine; take the green part and add to it four pounded crackers; stir this into one quart of boiling milk; then add the lobste...
-Poultry And Game
Whoso seeks an audit here, Propitious pays his tribute - game or fish, Wild fowl or venison, and his errand speed. - Cowper. Boiled Fowl Take a young fowl and fill the inside with oys...
-Poultry And Game. Part 2
Dressing For Chickens Or Turkey Mrs. F. D. Chop bread crumbs quite fine, season well with pepper, salt and plenty of butter; moisten with a very little water, and add a few oysters with a little...
-Poultry And Game. Part 3
Chicken Croquettes Mrs. P. B. Ayer. Two well cooked chickens chopped fine; one pound rice boiled not more than twenty minutes; an onion, if preferred; one-half pound old cheese grated; parsley chop...
-Poultry And Game. Part 4
Croquettes Mrs. I. N. Isham. Take cold fowl or fresh meat of any kind, with slices of ham, fat and lean; chop all together very fine ; add half as much grated bread, and season with salt, pepper...
-Ducks
Miss S. P., Albany, N. Y. When roasted, use dressing as for turkey, with the addition of a few slices of onion. Many cooks lay over the game slices of onions, which takes away the fishy flavor, rem...
-Poultry Cooking Suggestion
M. A. T. Singe all poultry with alcohol, and dip quails into clarified butter for broiling. Pressed Chicken Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. Cut up the fowls and place in a kettle with a tight cover, so ...
-Meats
Cook, see all your sawces Be sharp and poynant in the palate, that they may Commend you ; look to your roast and baked meats handsomely, And what new kickshaws and delicate made things.'' ...
-Meats. Part 2
Yorkshire Pudding Mrs. Joseph B. Leake. To be eaten with roast beef, instead of a vegetable. Three tablespoons flour, mixed with one pint of milk, three eggs and a little salt. Pour into a shall...
-Meats. Part 3
Mock Duck Mrs. C. C. Stratton, Evanston. Take the round of beef steak, salt and pepper either side; prepare bread or crackers with oysters or without, as for stuffing a turkey; lay your stuffing...
-Meats. Part 4
To Corn Beef Mrs. A. M. Gibbs. To each gallon of cold water, put one quart of rock salt, one ounce of salt-petre and four ounces of brown sugar, (it need not be boiled,) as long as any salt rema...
-Meats. Part 5
Boiled Leg Of Mutton Mrs. J. Brown. Boil well in clear water until tender, seasoning the water with salt; serve with egg sauce, and garnish with parsley, sliced lemons, or some sour jelly. ...
-Meats. Part 6
Veal Pate M. A. P. Four pounds of veal and one and one-half pounds of salt pork chopped together, raw, and very fine, with four rolled crackers; two well beaten eggs, one lemon and one small oni...
-Meats. Part 7
Jellied Veal M. A. T. Boil the veal tender, pick it up fine, put in a mould, add the water it was boiled in, and set it in a cold place; season with salt and pepper to taste; a layer of hard boi...
-Sweet Breads
Scald in salt and water, take out the stringy parts; then put in cold water a few minutes; dry in a towel; dip in egg and bread crumbs, and fry brown in butter; when done place in a hot dish ; pour in...
-Calf's Liver
Calf's Liver - Fried Cut in thin slices; wash and drain them, roll them in corn meal or cracker crumbs, and fry in fresh or salt pork gravy or butter. Calf's Liver - Stewed Boil till part...
-To Roast Venison
Mrs. Porter. Wash a saddle of venison thoroughly in several waters, then rub it over with vinegar, red pepper and a little salt; lard with strips of salt pork rolled in seasoned bread crumbs; season i...
-Roast Pig
See that the pig has been well scalded ; put in the body a stuffing of dry bread crumbs, seasoned with sage, sail and pepper, and sew it up; skewer the legs back or the under part will not crisp; put ...
-Sausages
Souse When the pig's feet and ears are well cleaned and scraped, put in cold water, and over the fire to boil; when tender, put them in a jar; prepare a pickle of half a gallon of cider vinegar, wh...
-Ham
Ham Sandwiches Mrs. W. Butterfield. Take some boiled ham and chop it very fine, mix it with a dressing composed of one dessert spoon of mustard, two of oil, one raw egg beaten very light, a litt...
-Salads, Sauces And Pickles
To make this condiment, your poet begs The powdered yellow of two hard-boiled eggs ; Two boiled potatoes, passed through the kitchen sieve, Smoothness and softness to the salad give ; Let onions atom...
-Salads, Sauces And Pickles. Part 2
Chicken Salad Mrs. Chas. Wheeler. To one chicken use the same quantity of celery, three or four eggs, one tablespoon mixed mustard, one teaspoon of salt...
-Salads, Sauces And Pickles. Part 3
Chicken Salad Mrs. Chas. Duffield. The yolks of six eggs, well beaten; one-half pint of melted butter, or the same quantity of olive oil; three tablespoons of mixed mustard (or more if it is not...
-Salads, Sauces And Pickles. Part 4
Cucumber Salad Mrs. King. Take a dozen ripe white spine cucumbers; wash, pare and cut into strips, taking out the seeds; cut into pieces, like small dice; to each dozen cucumbers, take twelve ...
-Sauces For Meat Or Fish
Drawn Butter Drawn butter forms the basis of most sauces. From this a great variety may be made, by adding to this different flavors - anchovies, ochra, onions, celery, parsley, mint and relishes &...
-Sauces For Meat Or Fish. Part 2
Egg Sauce Prepare drawn butter, and to this add three or four hard boiled eggs sliced or chopped. Fish Sauce One-quarter of a pound of fresh butter; one tablespoon of finely chopped parsl...
-Sauces For Meat Or Fish. Part 3
Chili Sauce Etta C. Springer. One peck ripe tomatoes boiled one hour; add a cup of salt, one quart of vinegar, one ounce whole cloves, one ounce cinnamon, one ounce allspice, one ounce ground wh...
-Sweet Pickles
Pickled Cherries Five pounds of cherries, stoned or not; one quart of vinegar, two pounds of sugar, one-half ounce of cinnamon ; one-half ounce of cloves, one-half ounce of mace; boil the sugar and...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 2
Sour Pickles Who peppered the highest was surest to please. Prepared Mustard C. D. Adams. Two tablespoons mustard, one teaspoon sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, boiling water enough to...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 3
Mixed Pickles Mrs. F. M. Cragin. Three hundred small cucumbers, four green peppers sliced fine, two large or three small heads cauliflower, three heads of white cabbage shaved fine, nine large onio...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 4
Pickled Cauliflower After cutting off all the green leaves, put the cauliflower into boiling water, with a good supply of salt, and boil from three to five minutes; take them out of the salt and wa...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 5
Green Tomato Pickles Mrs. J. L. Harris, Keokuk, Iowa. Chop one-half peck tomatoes, three onions, a gill of horse-radish, three green peppers; put them in a sieve and drain dry, salt in layers an...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 6
Pickled Green Tomatoes S. S. Pierce. One peck tomatoes, two quarts small white onions, one dozen green peppers, one cup salt, one cup sugar, one tablespoon of cloves, allspice, stick of cinnamon...
-Sweet Pickles. Part 7
Pickled Oysters Mrs. Carl Hammond. Wash the oysters and scald them in strong salt and water; skim them out and throw into cold water; scald vinegar well and whole peppers; let it get cold. Put the ...
-Relishes
Oyster Stew Mrs. A. S. Ewing. Strain the juice from the oysters placed in the colandei into a stew pan; let it come to a boil; remove the scum and a clear liquor will remain; turn cold water upon t...
-Toast
Toast the bread very quickly, dip each slice in boiling water (a little salt in the water); as soon as you have toasted it; then spread it with butter; cover and keep hot as you proceed. Make milk toa...
-Codfish Recipes
Codfish Balls Mrs. Banks. Take four cups of mashed potatoes; three cups of boiled codfish minced fine; add butter; mix well together; then add two well beaten eggs, beating it up again thoroughl...
-Beef Hash
Beef Hash Chop fine cold beef, either boiled or baked ; have ready cold boiled potatoes; to one pint of meat put one pint and a little more of potatoes, chopped fine; have ready a spider, with a go...
-Breakfast Steak
A nice steak of beef or veal; pound it with a steak mallet, if tough; lay in a baking tin, dredge it lightly with flour, season with salt and pepper, and if you like, a little chopped parsley; then pu...
-A Nice Breakfast Dish
Harriet N. Jenks. Mince cold beef or lamb ; if beef put in a pinch of pulverized cloves; if lamb, a pinch of summer savory to season it, very little pepper and some salt, and put it in a baking dis...
-Potato Puffs
Potato Puffs S. S. Pierce. Take cold roast meat (either beef, veal or mutton); clear it from gristle; chop fine; season with pepper and salt; boil and mash some potatoes, and make them into a pa...
-Rice Cakes
Mrs. A. M. Gibbs. One teacup of soft boiled rice, the yolk of one egg, a pinch of salt, two tablespoons of sifted flour, beaten well together; add sweet milk until it is about the consistency of sp...
-Chicken Croquettes
Mrs. Chaffee, Detroit. One plump chicken, two pounds veal cut from the round. Boil chicken and veal separately in cold water, just enough to cover; pick to pieces and chop. Cut up one-third of a lo...
-Veal Stew
Two pounds of veal steak cut in strips. Put in cold water in a skillet or spider and over the fire. The water should be just sufficient to cover the meat. Pare, wash and slice one small potato and put...
-Egg Recipes
Ham And Eggs Anonymous. Take pieces of cold ham chopped, and after cooking, add beaten eggs to suit your taste. Baked Eggs Mrs. L. M. Angle. Break six or seven eggs into a buttered dis...
-How To Make An Omelet
A distinguished authority says : In preparing an omelet remember five things a clean pan; the eggs must not be beaten too much; the omelet must not be too large; three eggs are better than ...
-How To Make An Omelet. Continued
Omelet E. V. Case, Elmhurst. Take three eggs, beat the whites and yolks separately; to the yolks after they are beaten, add a half teaspoon of salt and a teacup of rich cream, in which a heaping t...
-Cheese Dishes
Cheese Scallop Soak one cup of dry bread crumbs in fresh milk. Beat into this three eggs; add one tablespoon of butter and one-half a pound of grated cheese; strew upon the top sifted bread crumbs,...
-Fish Relish
After Marlon Harland. One cup of drawn butter with an egg beaten in, two hard boiled eggs, mashed potato (a cup will do), one cup of cold fish (cod, halibut or shad), roe of cod or shad and one tea...
-Breakfast
Breakfast Gems Mrs. Brown. One cup sweet milk, one and a half cups flour, one egg, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon baking powder; beaten together five minutes ; bake in hot gem pans, in a hot ov...
-Breakfast Cakes
Breakfast Cake Mrs. C. Bradley. One pint of flour, three tablespoons of butter, three tablespoons of sugar, one egg, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoon cream tartar, one-half teaspoon soda; to be ...
-Cottage Cheese
Mrs. A. M. Gibbs. Pour boiling water on the thick milk in the pan in which it has turned, stirring while you pour; as soon as the milk separates from the whey and begins to appear cooked, let it se...
-White Corn Bread
Mrs. E. S. Cheeseborough. One pint of meal thoroughly scalded with hard-boiling water. Butter the size of an egg and one well-beaten egg; add milk to make it just thin enough to flow over the pan. ...
-Ypsilanti Egg Rolls
Mrs. A. M. Gibbs. Allow one egg for each person, two cups of milk for three eggs, four teaspoons of flour. Beat whites and yolks separately, and add the eggs last. Put a very little of the mixture ...
-Vegetables
Witness, thou best A nana, thou the pride Of vegetable life, beyond whate'r The poets imaged in the golden age. Quick, let me strip thee of thy tufty coat, Spread thy ambrosial stores, and feast with...
-Potatoes
Boiled Potatoes Old potatoes are better for being peeled and put in cold water an hour before being put over to boil. They should then be put into fresh cold water, when set over the fire. New pota...
-Parsnips
Boil until tender in a little salted water; then take up; skim them, cut in strips, dip in beaten egg, and fry in melted butter or hot lard. ...
-Turnips
Boil until tender; mash and season with butter, pepper, salt and a little rich milk or cream. Serve with mutton. ...
-Beets
Clean these nicely, but do not pare them, leaving on a short piece of the stalk. Then put over to boil in hot water. Young beets will cook tender in an hour; old beets require several hours boiling. W...
-Squash
Baked Squash Cut in pieces, scrape well, bake from one to one and a half hours, according to the thickness of the squash; to be eaten with salt and butter as sweet potatoes. Fried Squashes ...
-Green Corn
Green Corn - Boiled Throw the ears, when husked, into a kettle of boiling water, slightly salted, and boil thirty minutes. Serve in a napkin. Green Corn Oysters To a pint of grated corn a...
-Southern Way Of Boiling Rice
Mrs. James S. Gibbs. Pick over the rice; rinse it in cold water until perfectly clean, then put it in a pot of boiling water, allowing a quart of water to less than a teacup of rice; boil it hard s...
-Beans
Boston Baked Beans Soak over night one pint of beans in clear water; in the morning parboil the beans, and at the same time, in another dish, parboil a piece of salt pork, about three inches long a...
-Green Peas
Shell and put into boiling water, cook from thirty to thirty-five minutes; drain and season with rich milk or cream, butter, pepper and salt; some cooks also add a little flour or corn starch to thick...
-Asparagus
Cut off the green ends, and chop up the remainder of the stalks; boil until tender, and season with salt and pepper; have ready some toasted bread in a deep dish; mix together equal parts of flour an...
-Cabbage
Baked Cabbage Boil a cabbage, then put in a colander and drain it until perfectly dry; then chop fine; put in pepper, salt and a little cream, and put in an earthern baking pan, and into the oven. ...
-Cauliflower
Remove the leaves; cut the main stalk close to the flower; lay it in boiling milk and water slightly salted, with the stalk down; when done, take out carefully and drain in a colander, then place in t...
-Tomatoes
Escaloped Tomatoes Put in an earthern baking dish, a layer of cracker crumbs and small bits of butter; then a layer of tomatoes with a very little sugar sprinkled over them; then another layer of c...
-Egg Plant
Fried Egg Plant Mrs. F. M. Cragin. Slice the egg plant, at least half an inch thick; pare each piece carefully, and lay in salt and water, putting a plate upon the topmost, to keep it under the ...
-Macaroni
Macaroni Mrs. M. C. Gridley, Evanston. Cook macaroni in water until soft; then put in a deep dish with alternate layers of grated crackers and cheese, a little salt; fill up the dish with milk and ...
-Onions
Onions - Boiled Select those of uniform size; remove the outer skin, then boil until tender in a large quantity of milk and water; the flavor will be more delicate. Drain them when tender, and seas...
-Mushrooms
Mushrooms Fried When peeled put them into hot butter and let them heat thoroughly through - too much cooking toughens them. Season well with butter, pepper and salt. Serve on buttered toast; a te...
-Salsify
Salsify Stewed Scrape well and then cut in round slices; stew it in sufficient water to cover. When tender turn off nearly all the water; add cream and butter, salt and pepper and a little flour ru...
-Scalloped Oyster Plant
Boil the oyster plant until perfectly tender, then take out of water and rub through a colander; add butter, pepper, salt and milk, and mix well. Put in a baking dish and cover the top with bread crum...
-Puddings
And solid pudding against empty praise. Eve's Pudding If you want a good pudding, mind what you are taught; Take eggs, six in number, when bought for a groat; The fruit with which Ev...
-Puddings. Part 2
Fruit Pudding Mrs. Taylor, Ft. Wayne. One quart of flour, two tablespoons of butter, one tea-spoon of salt, two teaspoons of baking powder; make a soft dough of milk or water, roll out thin and spr...
-Puddings. Part 3
Black Pudding. Mrs. H. M. Kidder, Evanston. One teacup of molasses, one teacup of butter, one teacup of sugar, two teacups of flour, one teacup sour milk: four eggs, one nutmeg, one teaspoon sod...
-Puddings. Part 4
Potato Pudding Boil until white, mealy and very tender some potatoes; rub this finely washed through a colander; to a pint bowl of this while hot add one-quarter of a pound of butter, and mix well;...
-Puddings. Part 5
Rice Pudding E. Gage. One quart of milk, with two tablespoons of rice; let it come to a boil, then pour it over two tablespoons of sugar, one-half cup of raisins, a little lump of butter, flavor wi...
-Puddings. Part 6
A Quick Pudding Mrs. A. W. D. One-half pint of milk, one-half pint of cream, three eggs beaten separately, little over one-half pint flour; season with lemon or vanilla. Baked Indian Pudd...
-Puddings. Part 7
Dandy Jack Mrs. Benham. One pint milk, yolks of three eggs, two heaping tablespoons corn starch, one-half cup sugar; flavor as you like; for top, the whites of the eggs and a little sugar. ...
-Puddings. Part 8
Batter Pudding Mrs. H. L. Bristol. One pint of milk, four eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately, ten tablespoons of sifted flour, a little salt; beat in the whites of the eggs the last th...
-Puddings. Part 9
Bread Pudding Mrs. C. M., Winnetka, 111. Put a pint of scalded milk to a pint of bread crumbs, and add the yolks of four eggs well beaten, a teacup of sugar, butter the size of an egg, and the g...
-Puddings. Part 10
Apple Pudding Mrs. W. Guthrie. Five eggs, one pint milk, four tablespoons flour, four apples grated; bake one hour and a quarter. Serve with sweetened cream or pudding sauce. Apple Puddin...
-Puddings. Part 11
Currant Pudding Mrs. Bartlett. Slice a baker's loaf, add butter, stew and sweeten three pints of currants, turn over the bread, and set away until cold. Serve without sauce, slice the bread th...
-Puddings. Part 12
Jelly Pudding Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. One quart of milk, one pint of bread crumbs, yolks of four beaten eggs, one-half cup of sugar; bake about half an hour; when cool, spread jelly over the pudding...
-Puddings. Part 13
Baked Pudding Mrs. E. C. Chapin. Three tablespoons of corn starch to one quart of milk. Prepare and cook the same as for blanc mange. After it is cool, stir up with it thoroughly two or three egg...
-Puddings. Part 14
Pine-Apple Pudding From choice recipes by M. S. W., Boston. A grated pine-apple and its weight in sugar; half its weight in butter; five eggs; the whites beat to a stiff froth ; one cup of cream...
-Puddings. Part 15
Cream Tapioca Pudding Mrs. A. T. Hall. Soak three tablespoons of tapioca in water over night; put the tapioca into a quart of boiling milk, and boil half an hour: beat the yolks of four eggs wit...
-Puffs
Chocolate Puffs Mrs. O. L. Parker. One pound sugar sifted, one of chocolate chopped very fine; mix together; beat the white of an egg, and stir in your chocolate and sugar; continue to beat unti...
-Lemon Fritters
After Marion Harland. Beat up the whipped and strained yolks of five eggs with one-half a cup of powdered sugar; add the grated peel of half a lemon, one teaspoon of mingled nutmeg and cinnamon, a ...
-Pudding Sauces
I crack my brains to find out tempting sauces, And raise fortifications in the pastry. Pudding Sauce Anonymous. One cup of butter, one cup of milk, one cup of sugar, three eggs, flavor ...
-Pastry
Drink now the strong beer, Cut the white loaf here, The while the meat is a shredding For the rare mince pie, And the plums stand by To fill the paste that's a kneading. Old Song. ...
-Pies
Rice Pie Mrs. A. S. Ewing. One quart of milk, boiled; one small teacup of rice flour mixed in a little cold milk; add to the boiling milk two tablespoons of butter; when cold, add five eggs well...
-Lemon Pies
Lemon Pie Mrs. H. L. Adams, and others. One tablespoon of corn starch, boiled in a cup of water; one egg, one cup of sugar, juice and rind of one lemon ; bake in a crust. This will fill one s...
-Mince Pies
Mince Pies Six pounds of lean fresh beef boiled tender, when cold, chopped fine, a pound of beef suet chopped fine, five pounds of apples chopped, two pounds of raisins, seeded, two pounds of curra...
-Cream Pies
Cream Pie Mrs. M. A. Green. Boil nearly one pint of new milk; take two small tablespoons of corn starch beaten with a little milk; to this add two eggs; when the milk has boiled, stir this in slowl...
-Philadelphia Butter Pie
Mrs. A. N. Arnold. Cover a pie plate with crust, as for a custard pie; take a piece of butter the size of an egg, two-thirds of a cup of sugar, one cup of sweet cream, one tablespoon of flour; stir...
-Squash Pies
Squash Pie Mrs. P. B. Ayer. One crust, one small cup of dry maple sugar dissolved in a little water, two cups of strained squash stirred in the sugar; add four eggs, two teaspoons of allspice, two ...
-Custard Pie
Mrs. E. E. Marcy, Evanston. Make a custard of the yolks of three eggs with milk, season to the taste; bake it in ordinary crust; put it in a a brick oven, that the crust may not be heavy, and as so...
-Washington Pies
Washington Pie Mrs. A. L. Chetlain. One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of sweet milk, three eggs, two and one-half cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder...
-Cocoanut Pies
Cocoanut Pie Mrs. E. P. Thomas, Rockford, 111. Grate fresh cocoanut; to one cup of cocoanut add one and one-half cups of sweet milk, the yolks of four eggs, a little salt, and sweeten to taste; ...
-Tartlets
Polish Tartlets Roll some good puff paste out thin, cut it into two and a half inch squares; brush each square over with the white of an egg, then fold down the corners so that they all meet in the...
-Custards
They serve up salmon, venison and wild boars, By hundreds, dozens and by scores, Hogsheads of honey, kilderkins of mustard, Plum puddings, pancakes, apple pies and custard. Mrs. Grave's Cust...
-Custards. Continued
Sago Custard C. D. Adams. Three tablespoons sago boiled in a little water till clear; add one quart of milk, let it come to a boil, then add five or six well-beaten eggs and sugar to taste. Put ...
-Floating Islands
Floating Island Mrs. E. E. Marcy. One-half package gelatine, one pint of water; soak twenty minutes; add two cups of sugar, set it on the stove to come to a boil; when nearly cold, add the white...
-Creams
Whipped Cream Mix one pint of cream with nine tablespoons of fine sugar and one gill of wine in a large bowl; whip these with the cream dasher, and as the froth rises, skim into the dish in which i...
-Meringues
Tapioca Meringue Mrs. Spruance. One teacup of tapioca soaked in one and a half pints of warm water three hours; peel and core eight tart apples; fill apples with sugar, grating a little nutmeg o...
-Melange
Mrs. W. Guthrie. Line a deep pie dish with pie crust, and spread on a thin layer of tart apple sauce, then a layer of buttered bread; on this another layer of apple. Bake until the crust is done...
-Sponges
Lemon Sponge Mrs. Lamkin. Two ounces of gelatine; pour over one pint of cold water; let it stand fifteen minutes; add half a pint of boiling water, three-quarters of a pound of white sugar, and ...
-Snow Puddings
Snow Souffle Mrs. J. Louis Harris, Keokuk, Iowa. Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth; dissolve one-half box of gelatine in a little more than a pint of hot water, two cups of sugar, and th...
-Charlotte Cakes
Apple Charlotte Mrs. A. M. Gibbs. Put a layer of bread, cut in thin slices and buttered on both sides, in the bottom of your pudding dish, and on this a layer of apples cut as for a pie, seasoni...
-A Simple Dessert
A. S. Ewing. Put a teacup of tapioca into sufficient cold water; boil until the lumps become almost transparent; squeeze the juice of two lemons partially into the mixture, then slice them into it,...
-Jellied Grapes
Mrs. A. M. Lewis. A very delicate dish, is made of one-third of a cup of rice, two cups of grapes, half a cup of water, and two spoons of sugar. Sprinkle the rice and sugar among the grapes, while ...
-Ices
Glittering squares of colored ice, Sweetened with syrups, tinctured with spice; Creams and cordials and sugared dates; Syrian apples, Othmanee quinces, Limes and citrons and apricots, A...
-Ice Creams
Ice Cream M. One pint milk, yolks of two eggs, six ounces sugar, one tablespoon corn starch; scald until it thickens; when cool, add one pint whipped cream and the whites of two eggs, beaten sti...
-Frutt Deserts
Tutti Frutti From In the Kitchen. A rich vanilla cream with candied cherries, raisins, currants and citron. The fruit must be added when the cream is nearly frozen. An Excellent Desser...
-Fruits
Fruit of all kinds, in coat Rough, or smooth rind, or bearded husk, or shell, She gathers tribute large, and on the board Heaps with unsparing hand. - Paradise Lost. Bring me berries or such ...
-Fruits. Part 2
Mock Strawberries And Cream Mrs. Bartlett. Take any quantity of sound ripe peaches, and well flavored eating apples, say in proportion of three peaches to one apple, peel the fruit nicely, cut a la...
-Fruits. Part 3
Preserved Plums Jennie June. Allow to every pound of fruit three-quarters of a pound of sugar; put into stone jars alternate layers of fruit and sugar, and place the jars in a moderately warm ov...
-Canned Fruit
Canned Pine Apple Mrs. F. L. Bristol. For six pounds of fruit when cut and ready to can, make syrup with two and a half pounds sugar and nearly three pints of water; boil syrup five minutes and ski...
-Fruit Butter
Cranberry Sauce Mrs. Bartlett. One quart cranberries, one quart water, one quart sugar, stew slowly. Pic Nic Lemon Butter Etta C. Springer. Grate the rind, add juice of three lemons...
-Jellies
Apple Jelly Mrs. J. H. Brown. Take nice green apples that will cook nicely; quarter the apples without paring, put them in a pan or kettle and cover over with water, and keep them covered; let t...
-Jellies. Part 2
Currant Jelly Mrs. J. P. Hoit. Jam and strain the currants; to each pint of juice add one pound sugar; boil the juice fifteen minutes without sugar, and the same time after it is in; strain into...
-Jellies. Part 3
Orange Jelly From In the Kitchen. One box of Coxe's gelatine soaked one hour in one pint of cold water; add one pint of boiling water, one pound of sugar, and one pint of sour orange juice. ...
-Jams
Rhubarb Jam Mrs. T. W. Anderson. Cut into pieces about an inch long, put a pound of sugar to every pound of rhubarb, and leave till morning; pour the syrup from it and boil till thickens; then a...
-Marmalade
Orange Marmalade Mrs. J. Young Scammon. One dozen Seville oranges, one dozen common oranges, one dozen lemons ; boil the oranges and lemons whole in water for five hours ; scoop out the inside, ...
-Candy
Sweets to the Sweet. In order to understand the secret of candy making, it will be necessary to understand the action of heat upon sugar. The first step in this process is the reduction of sugar ...
-Caramels
Candy Caramels Mary H. One pint cream, one pound sugar, one cup butter, one-fourth cup chocolate, one cup of molasses. Chocolate Caramels Etta C. Springer. Two pounds sugar,...
-Candy. Continued
Cream Candy One pound white sugar, one wineglass vinegar, one tumbler water, vanilla; boil one-half hour, and pull, if you choose. Cocoanut Drops Mrs. P. B. Ayer. To one grated...
-Bread And Yeast
There is scent of Syrian myrrh, There is incense, there is spice, There are delicate cakes and loaves, Cakes of meal and polypi. - Grecian Ode. But I ate naught Till I that lovely child of ...
-Yeast
Mrs. E. S. Chesebrough. Put two tablespoons of hops in a muslin bag and boil them in three quarts of water for a few minutes; have ready a quart of hot mashed potatoes, put in one cup of flour, one...
-Bread
Mrs. E. S. Chesebrough. Take four quarts of sifted flour and a teacup of yeast, a pinch of salt, and wet with warm milk and water stiff enough to knead. Work it on the board until it requires no mo...
-Brown Bread
Mrs. Furlong's Brown Bread Three cups of corn meal, one cup of flour, one cup of syrup, one cup of sour milk, two cups of sweet milk, one teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon of salt; steam four hours. ...
-Corn Bread
Steamed Corn Bread Mrs. Jane Conger. Take three cups of meal, and one of flour, scald two cups of the meal with boiling water, add the other cup of meal and flour, two cups of sour milk, one cup...
-Indian Bread
Indian Bread Mrs. G. H. L. Five cups Indian meal, yellow, five cups sour milk, three cups rye flour, one-half cup molasses, one tablespoon saleratus. Indian Bread Mrs. A. T. Hall. O...
-Graham Bread
Graham Bread Mrs. B. J. Seward. One pint sweet milk, one-half cup molasses, one tea-spoon saleratus, one teaspoon salt. Mix thin enough to pour. Old Fashioned Graham Bread Mrs. Pul...
-Rolls
Mrs. H. F. Waite. To the quantity of light bread dough that you would take for twelve persons, add the white of one egg well beaten, two tablespoons of white sugar, and two tablespoons of butter; w...
-Biscuits
Tremont Biscuit Brought from Boston, by Mrs. O. B. Wilson. One and a half pints of warm milk, one tablespoon lard, two tablespoons white sugar, a little salt, one yeast cake (Twin Bro.'s), or a ...
-Biscuits. Continued
French Biscuits Mrs. Lind. Two cups of butter, two cups of sugar, one egg, (or the whites of two,) half a cup of sour milk, half a teaspoon of soda, flour to roll; sprinkle with sugar. Raise...
-Buns
Two coffeecups bread dough, two eggs, one cup sugar, spices, a few currants; mould like rusk and let them rise before baking. Buns M. Take one large coffeecup of warm milk, one-quarter ca...
-Shortcakes
Strawberry Shortcake Make good biscuit crust; bake in two tins of same shape and size; mix berries with plenty of sugar; open the shortcake, butter well and place berries in layers, alternated with...
-Lunn
Sally Lunn Mrs. J. H. Brown. One quart of warm milk, one-half cup of butter, one of sugar, five eggs and one cup of yeast; flour enough for stiff batter. Bake one hour. Sally Lunn M...
-Tea Cakes
Squash Cakes Miss C. Harris. One cup squash, one pint sour milk, one egg, a little salt, half a teaspoon soda, flour for a batter thick enough to fry. Cream Cakes Six eggs, beaten sepa...
-Gems
Wheat Gems Mrs. W. H. Ovington. One pint milk, two eggs, flour enough to make a batter not very stiff, two large spoons melted butter, yeast to raise them, a little soda and salt. Bake in gem ir...
-Pop Overs
Pop Overs Mrs. Andrews. One cup milk, one cup flour, one egg, beaten separately. Bake in cups, a tablespoon to each cup. Pop Overs S. S. Pierce. One cup flour, one cup milk, one egg, p...
-Rosettes
Mrs. A. S. Ewing. Mix a quart of milk into a pint of flour, beat the whites and yolks of three eggs separately, one tablespoon of butter cut fine into the mixture, half teaspoon salt; add the stiff...
-Fritters
Mrs. Brown. One pint sweet milk, four eggs, one quart flour and three teaspoons baking powder sifted together. Serve warm with maple syrup. Fritters Mrs. E. R. Harmon. Four eggs, one q...
-Green Corn Cakes
A. M. G. Twelve ears of sweet corn grated, one teaspoon of salt, one egg and a little more than a good tablespoon of flour. If the corn is not young and milky, very little or no flour need be used....
-Muffins
Graham Muffins S. L. S. One coffee cup of sour milk, one tablespoon of sugar or molasses, one egg, one scant teaspoon of soda, one-half of salt, enough Graham flour to make a stiff batter; sweet mi...
-Waffles
Waffles Yolks of three eggs, one quart milk, half cup melted butter, one heaping teaspoon baking powder. Afterwards add the whites of the eggs and flour enough to make a thin batter. Waffles...
-Rice Croquettes
Rice Croquettes C. T. C, Evanston, 111. Boil one cup of rice in one quart of milk or water, till tender; while warm add a piece of butter the size of an egg, two eggs; make into rolls, dip them ...
-Corn Meal Pones
Mrs. A. M. Gibbs. Scald a quart of milk; stir into one pint of meal six eggs beaten separately, a little salt, one tablespoon flour, two teaspoons baking powder; bake in white cups or small bowls and ...
-Good Breakfast Cakes
Mrs. J. H. Brown. Three eggs well beaten, two and a half teacups of flour, one pint of sweet milk, a little salt; make a batter of these, put in cups or rings and bake in a quick oven. ...
-Bannocks
M. One pint corn meal, pour on it boiling water to thoroughly wet it; let it stand a few minutes; add salt and one egg and a little sweet cream, or a tablespoon melted butter. Make into balls an...
-Corn Cakes
Stella's Corn Cake Mrs. F. M. Cragin. No. 1 - One pint milk, one pint meal, two eggs, a piece of butter size of an egg, one and a half teaspoons cream tartar, three-fourths teaspoon soda, one-ha...
-Griddle Cakes
Green Corn Griddle Cakes Mrs. C. M. Dickerman, Rockford, 111. Twelve ears corn grated, four eggs, one cup sweet milk (cream is better); one cup flour, three tablespoons butter, if you use milk, ...
-Mush
Indian or oat meal mush is best made in the following manner: Put fresh water in a kettle over the fire to boil, and put in some salt; when the water boils, stir in handful by handful corn or oat meal...
-Oat Meal Gruel
Take two tablespoons of oat meal, pour on it a pint of cold water; let it stand half a day, then pour it through a sieve and boil well one-quarter of an hour, stirring all the time; season according t...
-Weights And Measures
Ten eggs are equal to one pound. One pound of brown sugar, one pound of white sugar, powdered or loaf sugar broken, is equal to one quart. One pound of butter, when soft, is equal to one quart. ...
-Icing
The following rules should be observed where boiled icing is not used : Put the whites of your eggs in a shallow earthen dish and allow at least quarter of a pound or sixteen tablespoons of the fin...
-Icing. Part 2
Chocolate Frosting Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. Whites of two eggs, one and one-half cups of fine sugar, six great spoons of grated chocolate, two teaspoons of vanilla; spread rather thickly between laye...
-Icing. Part 3
Fruit Cake Louisa Churchill. One pound of sugar, one pound of butter, one pound flour, four pounds raisins, two pounds currants, one and one-half pounds citron, one gill brandy, one cup sour cre...
-Delicate Cake Icing
Delicate Cake Mrs. Anson Gorton. One coffeecup butter, two cofteecups sugar, four coffee-cups flour, one-half coffeecup milk. The whites of eight eggs, two teaspoons cream-tartar, even teaspoon ...
-White Cake Icing
White Cake Elmina Meeker, Cortland, 111. Two cups of white sugar, one of cream (sweet); two of flour, one tablespoon of butter, the whites of five eggs, one teaspoon of cream tartar, one-half of...
-Loaf Cake Icing
Raised Loaf Cake Mrs. F. D. Gray. Three cups of milk, two cups of sugar, one cup yeast, flour to make a thick batter. Stand till light ; then add two cups sugar, two cups butter, two eggs, raisi...
-Pound Cake Icing
Pound Cake Mrs. W. H. Ovington. One pound of flour, one of sugar, ten eggs; beat the yolks and sugar together; add one pound of butter, putting in the whites beaten to a froth, and the flour las...
-Feather Cake Icing
Feather Cake Mrs. A. P. Wightman. One cup sugar, one cup flour, one egg, one tablespoon melted butter, one-half cup sweet milk, one teaspoon baking powder, pinch of salt, flavor to taste; put in...
-Cream Cake Icing
Cream Cake Mrs. M. J. Woodworth. Three eggs, one and one-half cups flour, one cup sugar, two teaspoons baking powder, three tablespoons water, bake in jelly cake pans, making four cakes; cream, ...
-Corn Starch Cake Icing
Corn Starch Cake Mrs. Dickinson. One cup of butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, two-thirds cup corn starch and fill it up with flour, two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, whites ...
-Lady Cake Icing
Lady Cake Mrs. Ewing. One pound sugar, one-half pound butter, one pound of flour, whites of sixteen eggs, one and one-half teaspoons soda, one and one-half teaspoons cream tartar. Rub butter and s...
-Lemon Cake Icing
Lemon Cake Lake Forest, 111. Three cups of sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, five eggs, four cups flour; stir the butter and sugar to a cream, beat the eggs separately, the whites to a stiff ...
-Spice Cake Icing
Spice Cake Mrs. A. T. Hall. Two cups of sugar, two cups butter, six cups flour, one cup molasses, one cup milk, six eggs, one glass brandy, two teaspoons cream tartar, one teaspoon soda, two tea-sp...
-Marble Cake Icing
Marble Cake Mrs. J. Gilbert, Evanston. White Part. One cup white pulverized sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk, whites of four eggs, two and one-half cups flour, two hea...
-Hickory-Nut Cake Icing
Hickory-Nut Cake Mrs. Hobbs. One cup meats (broken), one and one-half of sugar, one-half of butter, two of flour, three-fourths of sweet milk, two teaspoons baking powder, the whites of four egg...
-Gold Cake Icing
Gold Cake Mrs. Russell. One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoon cream tartar, one-half tea-spoon soda, nutmeg, three cups flour, yolks of six eggs. ...
-Silver Cake Icing
Silver Cake Mrs. L. Bradley. Take whites of one dozen eggs, five cups flour, three cups powdered sugar, one cup butter, one cup cream or sweet milk, one teaspoon cream tartar, half a teaspoon so...
-Sponge Cake Icing
White Sponge Cake Mrs. L. H. Smith. One tumbler sifted flour, one and one- half of powdered sugar, one heaping teaspoon cream tartar, and a little salt; sift all together into a dish; beat the whit...
-Gingerbread Icing
Mrs. Wilder's Sponge Gingerbread In two cups molasses, sift two teaspoons soda and a dessert spoon ginger. Stir to a cream, then add four well beaten eggs, one cup butter melted, one cup sour milk ...
-Cake Icing
White Pound Cake Mrs. M. J. Woodworth. One pound of flour, one pound sugar, three-fourths pound butter, the whites of sixteen eggs beaten to a stiff froth; flavor with bitter almond. Elegant. ...
-Cake Icing. Continued
Nut Cake Mrs. Taylor, Fort Wayne. Two and a half cups sugar, one of butter, three and a half of flour, one of sweet milk, five eggs, one pound stoned raisins, one-half pound of citron, one-half ...
-Layer Cakes
Gentleman's Favorite Miss Anna M. Whitman, Indianapolis, Ind. Seven eggs beaten separately, one-half cup butter, two cups white sugar, two cups flour, two tablespoons baking powder, two tables...
-Layer Cakes. Part 2
Chocolate Cake Mrs. Monroe Frank. One cup of butter, two cups sugar, four cups flour, four eggs, three teaspoons of Royal Baking Powder, one cup sweet milk. For Frosting. - One-half cake Bak...
-Layer Cakes. Part 3
Custard Cake Mrs. James P. Clarke. Two cups sugar, six tablespoons melted butter, six eggs beaten separately, two and one-half cups flour, one-half cup milk, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cre...
-Doughnuts
Old-Fashioned Yankee Doughnuts Mrs. H. M. Riddle, Evanston. One pint milk, one teacup yeast; put yeast in milk, stir in flour and let it rise over night; in the morning add two teacups sugar, on...
-Small Cakes
Chess Cakes Mrs. Lamkin. Peel and grate one cocoanut, take one pound sugar, one-half pint water, and boil fifteen minutes; stir in the grated cocoanut. boil fifteen minutes longer, while warm ...
-Crullers
Crullers Ella Waggoner, Toledo. Eight heaping tablespoons sugar, four eggs, four tablespoons melted butter, two tablespoons milk, and two of wine (or four of milk), and a pinch of soda dissolved ...
-Cookies
Rusk Cookies Mrs. E. A. Forsyth. One cup melted butter, one and a half cups sugar, one cup of tepid water, two teaspoons Dr. Price's baking powder mixed well with sifted flour; roll out very thin, ...
-Jumbles
Whig Jumbles Mrs. W. H. Ovington. One teacup and a half of butter; three teacups of sugar, one cup of sour cream, four eggs, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in it, six cups of flour, nutmeg; drop...
-Cookie Drops
Sugar Drops Mrs. H. M. Buell. One pound flour, three-fourths pound of sugar, one-half of butter, four eggs, a gill of rose water. To be baked on paper. This will make sixty drops. Coco...
-Ginger Cookies
Ginger Cake Mrs. Mann, Freeport. One half cup butter, one of molasses, one of sugar, one of cold water, one heaping teaspoon soda, one quart of flour. Ginger and salt to taste; drop on the tins ...
-Drinks
The bubbling and loud hissing urn Throws up a steaming column; and the cups That cheer, but not inebriate, wait on each; So let us welcome peaceful evening in. - Cowper ...
-Tea
When the water in the tea-kettle begins to boil, have ready a tin tea-steeper; pour into the tea-steeper just a very little of the boiling water, and then put in tea, allowing one teaspoon of tea to e...
-Coffee
Cleanse the coffee, dry and roast the berries evenly but quickly, until they are browned to the centre, and are of a dark chestnut color. Grind as you use it, keeping the rest in a closely covered gla...
-Drinks. Continued
Chocolate Scrape Baker's chocolate fine, mix with a little cold water and the yolks of eggs well beaten ; add this to equa) parts of milk and water, and boil well, being careful that it does not bu...
-Vinegar
Raspberry Vinegar Mrs. W. S. Walker. To four quarts red raspberries, put enough vinegar to cover, and let them stand twenty-four hours; scald and strain it; add a pound of sugar to one pint of juic...
-Syrops
Blackberry Syrup Mrs. Bausher. To one pint of juice, put one pound of white sugar, one-half ounce of powdered cinnamon, one-fourth ounce mace, and two teaspoons cloves; boil all together for qua...
-Beer
Splendid Ginger Beer Mrs. H. L. Bristol. Five gallons of water, one-half pound ginger root boiled, four pounds sugar, one-eighth pound cream tartar, one bottle essence of lemon, one ounce of tar...
-Miscellaneous Cookery
What does cookery mean ? It means the knowledge of all fruits and herbs and balms and spices, and of all that is healing and sweet in fields and groves, and savory in meats. It means carefulness, and ...
-Lime Water
Mrs. E. B. Lynde, Milwaukee. One of the most useful agents of household economy, if rightly understood, is lime water. Its mode of preparation is as follows : Put a stone of fresh unslacked lime ...
-Preserving Autumn Leaves
Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. These may be easily preserved and retain their natural tints, or nearly so, by either of the following methods: As they are gathered they may be laid between the leaves of a mag...
-For Crystalizing Grass
Mrs. Ludlam, Evanston. Take one and one-half pounds of rock alum, pour on three pints of boiling water; when quite cool, put into a wide-mouth vessel, hang in your grasses, a few at a time. Do not ...
-Camphor Ice
Mrs. A. M. One ounce of lard, one ounce spermaceti, one ounce camphor, one ounce almond oil, one-half cake of white wax; melt and turn into moulds. Camphor Ice Mrs. Bartlett. One-half ...
-Cold Cream
Mrs. Anna Marble. Four ounces sweet almond oil, two of rose water, two of white wax, two of cocoa butter, two of spermaceti; put a bowl in a pan of boiling water; cut the spermaceti, white wax and ...
-To Beautify Teeth
Dissolve two ounces of borax in three pints of boiling water, and before it is cold, add one teaspoon of spirits of camphor; bottle it for use. A teaspoon of this with an equal quantity of tepid water...
-Hair Tonic
Mrs. A. M. One-half ounce sugar of lead, one-half of lac sulphur, one quart of rose water, six tablespoons castor oil. ...
-For Cleaning Hair Brushes
Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. Use spirits of ammonia and hot water; wash them well and shake the water out, drying on a coarse towel; they will look white and clean as new; little or no soap is needed. ...
-Japanese Cleansing Cream
One-fourth pound white castile soap, three ounces ammonia, one of ether, one of spirits of wine, one of glycerine; cut the soap fine and dissolve in one quart rain water; then add four quarts rain wat...
-For Clothes That Fade
One ounce sugar of lead in a pail of rain water. Soak over night. ...
-To Wash Calico
Mrs. Edward Ely. Blue calicoes or muslins will retain their color if one small teaspoon of sugar of lead is put into a pail of water and the articles washed in the water. Black Calicoes W...
-To Wash Woolen Blankets
Mrs. J. A. Packard. Dissolve soap enough to make a good suds in boiling water, add a tablespoon of aqua ammonia; when scalding hot, turn over your blankets. If convenient, use a pounder, or any way to...
-To Wash Woolen
E. A. Forsyth. To every pail of water, add one tablespoon of ammonia, and the same of beef gall; wash out quickly, and rinse in warm water, adding a very little beef gall to the water. This will re...
-To Wash Carpets
E. A. Forsyth. Spread the carpet where you can use a brush; take Irish potatoes and scrape them into a pail or tub of water and let them stand over night, using one peck to clean a large carpet; tw...
-Washing Fluid
Mrs. A. P. Iglehart. Nine tablespoons unslacked lime, two pounds of sal soda, four quarts water; let this simmer half an hour, then bottle up. Take a small teacup to a boiler of water. Wa...
-To Make Good Starch
Mrs. D. Mix the starch with cold water, add boiling water until it thickens, then add dessert spoon of sugar, and a small piece of butter. Makes a stiff and glossy finish equal to laundry. ...
-An Excellent Hard Soar
Mrs. Kate Johnson. Pour twelve quarts soft boiling water on two and one-half pounds of unslacked lime; dissolve five pounds sal soda in twelve quarts soft hot water; then mix and let them remain fr...
-Cleaning Silver
Mrs. O. L. Parker. Never put a particle of soap about your silver if you would have it retain its original lustre. When it wants polish, take a piece of soft leather and whiting and rub hard. The p...
-Polish For Zinc Or Tin
Mrs. Thos. A. Hill. To three pints of water add one ounce of nitric acid, two ounces of emery, and eight ounces of pumice stone; shake well together. Any druggist will fill it for fifteen cents. ...
-Stove Polish
Mrs. O. L. Parker. Stove lustre, when mixed with turpentine and applied in the usual manner, is blacker, more glossy, and more durable than when mixed with any other liquid. The turpentine prevents...
-To Extract Ink
To extract ink from cotton, silk and woolen goods, saturate the spot with spirits of turpentine and let to remain several hours ; then rub it between the hands. It will crumble away without injuring e...
-For Bleaching Cotton Cloth
Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. One pound chloride of lime, dissolved and strained; put in two or three pails water; thoroughly wet the cloth and leave it in over night; then rince well in two waters. This wil...
-To Remove Tar
Rub well with clean lard, afterwards wash with soap and warm water. Apply this to either hands or clothing. ...
-Javelle Water For Mildew Stains
One pound of chloride of lime, two of washing soda, two gallons of soft water; pour one gallon of boiling water to the ingredients to dissolve them, adding the cold water when dissolved. ...
-Coloring Cotton Carpet Rags
Mrs. S. I. Parker, Channahon, 111. Blue. - For five pounds of cloth, take five ounces of copperas, with two pails of water in a tin or copper boiler; set it over the fire till the copperas is disso...
-To Boil Corn Beef
Mrs. E. A. Forsyth. Put into boiling water when you put it on to cook, and do not take it out of the pot when done, until cold. This will leave the meat juicy, instead of dry, when cold. ...
-To Prevent Red Ants
Put one pint of tar in an earthen vessel, pour on it two quarts of boiling hot water, and place it in your closet. ...
-For Preserving Eggs
Mrs. B. F. Adams. To one pint of unslaked lime and one pint of salt, pour one pail of boiling water; when cold, pour over the eggs, having placed them in a jar or tub, with the small end of the egg...
-Cleaning Marble
Mrs. Gray. Dissolve a large lump of Spanish whiting in water which has previously dissolved a teaspoon of washing soda, take only sufficient water to moisten the whiting, and it will become a paste...
-Furniture Polish
No. i. Shellac varnish, linseed oil and spirits of wine, equal parts. No. 2. Linseed oil, alcohol, equal parts. No. 3. Linseed oil five ounces, turpentine two ounces, oil of vitrio...
-Cleaning White Paint
Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. Spirits of ammonia, used in sufficient quantity to soften the water and ordinary hard soap, will make the paint look white and clean with half the effort of any other method I h...
-The Fireless Cooker
Fireless cooking is cooking, as is obvious, without a fire. This statement is true and not true, for the fire-less cooker cannot generate heat, and foods must first be raised to the boiling point on a...
-Soup Stocks
Soup stock, either seasoned or unseasoned, may be cooked in the fireless cooker. If a brown stock is wanted the meat should be browned in drippings as for any good stew, cold water added in the right ...
-Cereals
For those who wish to have a cooked cereal for break-fast, the fireless cooker has become well-nigh indispensable. Oatmeal, for instance, cooked thus will neither scorch nor boil dry, nor will it need...
-Dried Vegetables
It is now recognized that peas, beans, and lentils - everything that grows in a pod have the nitrogenous elements that we have believed we could only get from a meat diet, and that they furnis...
-Boiled Beef
Corned beef, which is so seldom well cooked, may be beautifully done in the fireless cooker. A rather large piece may be cooked most advantageously, and the cook who is most particular picks out her o...
-Chicken
Chicken may be stewed, fricasseed, braised, and jellied to advantage in the cooker. For most of these dishes it is prepared, cut up, and boiled for ten minutes or so in salted water and then put in th...
-Green Vegetables
Green vegetables should always be put on to cook in boiling water, despite the fact that one of the makers of a much advertised cooker gives contrary directions. The starches of vegetables are easily ...
-Steamed Breads And Puddings
If the cooker is a good one it affords an excellent means for steaming breads and puddings. Those who have made their own hay boxes have devised a great number of ways for managing these matters. ...
-Dried Fruits
The prune is especially improved by long cooking. Dried fruits must be washed very carefully and often many times in order to get them thoroughly clean, and soaked for twelve hours. Add two cups of wa...
-The Casserole
The casserole is a simple covered dish made of fireproof pottery. It is counted as among the very newest and most aesthetic of developments among cooking and table wares. But it is not a new thing und...
-Chicken En Casserole
Clean and joint a tender spring chicken. Put into a frying pan three tablespoons of butter and fry in this a small onion and a carrot, both cut into tiny dice. When these are lightly browned turn them...
-Mutton Chops En Casserole
Melt two tablespoons of butter, add three slices of onion and saute in it chops from shoulder of mutton. Put in a casserole a quarter cup each of turnips, celery, and onion, lay the chops on top of th...
-Beef En Casserole
One pound of round steak, the best cut, and a bunch of soup vegetables - celery, parsley, turnip, carrot, par-snip, and onion. After trimming the steak cut it into pieces one inch square, and saute i...
-Potatoes En Casserole
Boil twelve medium-sized potatoes in their skins. Pare, place on a board and chop with a knife, season with salt and pepper and one sweet Spanish pepper, diced, with just a suspicion of onion rubbed o...
-Sunday Night Suppers
There is a quite general sentiment that the Sunday dinner should be the best, the most conventional and attractively served of any of the week. On the other hand the Sunday night supper is regarded as...
-Pumpernickel Sandwiches
Slice pumpernickel bread thin and cut these slices in half. Butter two slices of white bread of the same size as the half slices and place the pumpernickel between. This makes a very attractive sandwi...
-Lemon Sandwich
One of the tastiest sandwiches and the most healthful one may put his teeth into is the lemon sandwich. Pare the lemon and with a sharp knife cut it into thin slices. Put these between buttered slices...
-Pineapple Sandwiches
For almost any of the sandwiches made the bread may be toasted and unless it is very fresh and good it is better this way. The bread or the toast may also be made daintier by cutting it into fancy sha...
-Halibut Moulds
Almost any cold fish may be used to advantage with sauce of melted butter. If no cold meat is on hand a slice of halibut may be boiled in the chafing dish with a seasoning of a bay leaf cooked with it...
-Cheese Balls
Cottage or Neufchatel cheese may be made into little balls and dipped in chopped parsley decorated with pimento for a very pretty salad. Another cheese ball may be made by grating one and one-half cup...
-Vegetable Salads
It is only within recent years that we have learned how good cold beet is with a French dressing. The small beets make the prettier salad if the vegetable is sliced. If the beets are large they should...
-Aspic Jellies
The meat or vegetable aspics are pretty dishes for the Sunday night supper. To make a tomato aspic use one-half can of tomatoes, three cloves, one-half teaspoon salt, one stick of celery. Stew twenty ...
-Angelica
Cut up one orange, one banana, one apple, twelve dates, and add some chopped nuts. Pour over the mixture four tablespoons of water, four of sugar, and the juice of one-half lemon. Allow the mixture to...
-Banana Fluff
Peel one-half dozen bananas, rub them through a coarse sieve, add a pinch of salt and powdered sugar to taste, and whip until light and frothy. Decorate with candies, cherries, pieces of marshmallow, ...
-Sauces
Both sweet and meat sauces go a long way towards making delicate and tasty the cold sliced meat or the cakes which one buys in an emergency at the delicatessen shops. The plain white sauce may serve f...
-Sunday Night Sandwich
A hearty sandwich is made from a cup of cold ham minced fine, with five olives and one tender stalk of celery, spread between thin slices of white bread, with just a tiny bit of salad dressing. This m...







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